Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts. There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature– the assurance that dawn comes after night and spring after winter. -Rachel Carlson
Nautilus Spiral - 
I think it is fair to say I have been drawn to and fascinated by the appearance of spirals, their balance, strength, and beauty, and been drawn to them ever since I was a very young child.  
"The Fibonacci numbers are Nature’s numbering system. They appear everywhere in Nature, from the leaf arrangement in plants, to the pattern of the florets of a flower, the bracts of a pinecone, or the scales of a pineapple. The Fibonacci numbers are therefore applicable to the growth of every living thing, including a single cell, a grain of wheat, a hive of bees, and even all of mankind.” — Stan Grist

Nautilus Spiral -

I think it is fair to say I have been drawn to and fascinated by the appearance of spirals, their balance, strength, and beauty, and been drawn to them ever since I was a very young child.  

"The Fibonacci numbers are Nature’s numbering system. They appear everywhere in Nature, from the leaf arrangement in plants, to the pattern of the florets of a flower, the bracts of a pinecone, or the scales of a pineapple. The Fibonacci numbers are therefore applicable to the growth of every living thing, including a single cell, a grain of wheat, a hive of bees, and even all of mankind.” — Stan Grist

Write Up by Merle Robillard - photos by Brent Lewin
Historically the Chin were adored for their beauty and King’s would come to villages to steal men’s wives. As a measure against their women being stolen, village elders started tattooing teenage girls to make them ‘ugly’. The tradition stuck and over generations eventually lost it’s original meaning of ugliness and came to represent courage, beauty and strength. However, as these traditional groups began moving outside their villages, the struggle between tradition and modernity has placed tribal Chin culture under increasing threat of being absorbed by the dominant Burmese. Unique language, customs and dress have been abandoned. Under this pressure to assimilate, the practice of facial tattooing has also been discontinued. Currently there remain only a handful of women adorning facial tattoos.

Write Up by Merle Robillard - photos by Brent Lewin

Historically the Chin were adored for their beauty and King’s would come to villages to steal men’s wives. As a measure against their women being stolen, village elders started tattooing teenage girls to make them ‘ugly’. The tradition stuck and over generations eventually lost it’s original meaning of ugliness and came to represent courage, beauty and strength. However, as these traditional groups began moving outside their villages, the struggle between tradition and modernity has placed tribal Chin culture under increasing threat of being absorbed by the dominant Burmese. Unique language, customs and dress have been abandoned. Under this pressure to assimilate, the practice of facial tattooing has also been discontinued. Currently there remain only a handful of women adorning facial tattoos.