Pinterest
sand at HarvestHeart
HarvestHeart's avatar

earth and water - nature’s art

Star Sand - Japan

The local legends states that star sand was made of the tiny skeletons of the offspring of the Southern Cross and the North Star, who were killed by a giant serpent right after being born in the ocean. But according to science, these beautiful particles are the exoskeletons of millions of foraminifera–marine protozoans–that are believed to be fossil evidence dating back 550 million years ago, one of the oldest fossils known to man.

The best time to find some is just after a typhoon, when the sand stars are stirred up beneath the ocean floor and washed up on the shore in enormous numbers. If you look closely enough, you might even find some that are still alive!

Source:  Whereonearth

Beach Art - Andres Amador - San Francisco 

  • He spends hours creating these intricate masterpieces, knowing that the tide will soon come in and wash away his work forever. 
  • He says he does it because it’s fun and he gets to go to the beach.

Source - Amazing Oasis

The bee pictured above, known as Augochloropsis sumptuosa, is a sand specialist, he explains. “It hangs out [on the] sand hills of North Carolina. You’ll see them on the Eastern Shore in the dune areas.”
This species forages for pollen from flowers located on the edges of those sand dunes.
Photography by Sam Droege, USGS

The bee pictured above, known as Augochloropsis sumptuosa, is a sand specialist, he explains. “It hangs out [on the] sand hills of North Carolina. You’ll see them on the Eastern Shore in the dune areas.”

This species forages for pollen from flowers located on the edges of those sand dunes.

Photography by Sam Droege, USGS

The Journey Begins

The Journey Begins

natural palette

natural palette

Sand Patterns

Sand Patterns

sea treasures

sea treasures

Low Tide

Low Tide

Path to the Dunes - Mikhail Vershinin

Path to the Dunes - Mikhail Vershinin

beach umbrella

beach umbrella

THE EARTHQUAKE ROSE 
Photographs by Norman MacLeod

On February 28, 2001, a magnitude 6.8 earthquake, located some thirty miles (48 km) below the surface of the Earth moved the ground for a bit more than half a minute. Damage was surprisingly light on account of the epicenter’s depth. A sand tracing pendulum located at a shop in Port Townsend, Washington, called Mind Over Matter (since moved to Sedona, Arizona), produced some very interesting patterns.
The smooth curves you see on the outside are what you normally see when someone sets the pendulum in motion. The seismic activity is responsible for the rose-shaped pattern you see in the middle. A beautiful design by one of nature’s most powerful forces.

Related articles
The Rose Drawn by an Earthquake (neatorama.com)
Seismic fabric could protect old buildings from earthquake harm (smartplanet.com)
Earthquake hits border between Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan (en.trend.az)
THE EARTHQUAKE ROSE 
Photographs by Norman MacLeod

On February 28, 2001, a magnitude 6.8 earthquake, located some thirty miles (48 km) below the surface of the Earth moved the ground for a bit more than half a minute. Damage was surprisingly light on account of the epicenter’s depth. A sand tracing pendulum located at a shop in Port Townsend, Washington, called Mind Over Matter (since moved to Sedona, Arizona), produced some very interesting patterns.

The smooth curves you see on the outside are what you normally see when someone sets the pendulum in motion. The seismic activity is responsible for the rose-shaped pattern you see in the middle. A beautiful design by one of nature’s most powerful forces.

Beach pastels

Beach pastels

The Sea Breeze - Vitaly Sokol

The Sea Breeze - Vitaly Sokol

Sand Circles - The Art of Jim Denevan

Sand Circles - The Art of Jim Denevan