minerva95aus)
I adore Aboriginal art, the subjects and themes, the spirit-ethereal world combined with the wonders of nature, the earth, the sky, man one with nature, the color choice combinations, patterns and lines, the structure without losing the freedom of the creativity; it really is beautiful.
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minerva95aus)
I adore Aboriginal art, the subjects and themes, the spirit-ethereal world combined with the wonders of nature, the earth, the sky, man one with nature, the color choice combinations, patterns and lines, the structure without losing the freedom of the creativity; it really is beautiful.
Related articles
Australia’s First Indeginous Fashion Week Launches, Aboriginal Model Samantha Harris Gives Us the Deets (fashionista.com)
Aboriginal rock art recorded in the Kimberley (abc.net.au)
Inspiration: Aboriginal Australian Art (bix707.wordpress.com)
Zoom Info

australian museum

Indigenous design vase, on hall table, Governm...
minerva95aus)

I adore Aboriginal art, the subjects and themes, the spirit-ethereal world combined with the wonders of nature, the earth, the sky, man one with nature, the color choice combinations, patterns and lines, the structure without losing the freedom of the creativity; it really is beautiful.

OPAL FOLKLORE - Aboriginal/Australia
Many opals are found in Australia, where Aboriginal folklore has it that opals were formed after the creator came to earth on a rainbow, and where he stepped, the rocks turned to opals.
The opal is a stone with as many qualities and meanings as it has colours. It is said to enhance the imagination and stimulate dreams. 
Opal is the birthstone for October, and is said to symbolise confidence and hope. 
Some say opal has therapeutic properties and can help healing eye problems in particular.
Opal is said to help ease the physical pain of expectant mothers during child birth by helping them to relax.

Opal from Yowah, Queensland, Australia
OPAL FOLKLORE - Aboriginal/Australia

Many opals are found in Australia, where Aboriginal folklore has it that opals were formed after the creator came to earth on a rainbow, and where he stepped, the rocks turned to opals.

The opal is a stone with as many qualities and meanings as it has colours. It is said to enhance the imagination and stimulate dreams.

Opal is the birthstone for October, and is said to symbolise confidence and hope.

Some say opal has therapeutic properties and can help healing eye problems in particular.

Opal is said to help ease the physical pain of expectant mothers during child birth by helping them to relax.

Brazil asks Venezuela to investigate village massacre claims

anoncentral:


Brazil asks Caracas for help in determining whether gold miners killed more than 70 members of Yanomami tribe from helicopter

Brazil is pressing Venezuela to determine whether Brazilian gold miners crossed the border and massacred a village of about 80 indigenous people from a helicopter.

The alleged assault, which a tribal group says could have killed more than 70 people in early July, came to light this week when the group asked Venezuela’s government to investigate. Because of the remoteness of the region and the scattered nature of the native settlements, fellow tribe members were able to alert the government only on Monday.

Brazil’s foreign ministry said on Friday that its embassy in Caracas had asked the Venezuelan government to provide it with any information that could help it determine whether the attack had happened and whether Brazilians had been involved.

Brazil’s National Indian Foundation, a government body that oversees indigenous affairs, said it would seek a joint investigation by officials from both countries at the site.

The border area between the two countries – a long, dense swath of theAmazon rainforest – has increasingly become the site of conflicts between indigenous people, gold miners, and others seeking to tap jungle resources.

The tribe that was allegedly attacked, the Yanomami, says it has given repeated, but unheeded, warnings to Venezuela’s government that the conflicts are intensifying.

On Wednesday, Venezuela’s public prosecutor said it would investigate. By late Friday, however, Venezuela’s government still could not confirm whether the attack had occurred.

The Venezuelan interior minister, Tareck Al Aissami, said in televised comments on Friday that officials had managed to speak with seven of the nine known groups of the Yanomami tribe and thus far had no proof of an attack in any of their settlements. Officials would soon meet with those and the other two groups to further clarify the matter, he said. “God willing, there won’t have been any violence among the other two groups either.”

In the document presented to Venezuelan authorities this week, Yanomami leaders said tribe members in the area had spoken with three villagers from the community where the attack allegedly took place.

The three villagers, the only inhabitants of the community known to be alive, said they had been hunting away from the settlement when they heard a “tokotoko” – their indigenous word for helicopter. They also heard gunfire and explosions, the document said. Other Yanomami who visited the village later said a communal hut had been burned and that they found charred bodies and bones.

The attack was the latest in a growing number of conflicts with Brazilian gold miners, the Yanomami said in the document. The tribe alerted soldiers in the region in late July about the attack and the soldiers interviewed some of the tribespeople who had seen the destroyed village, according to the document. Venezuela’s army has not commented.

The remote settlement is a five-hour helicopter flight, or 15-day walk, from Puerto Ayacucho, capital of the southern Venezuelan state of Amazonas. Because of the distance and isolation of many indigenous settlements, the government is often unable to protect tribes from incursions by outsiders. Much of the violence goes unreported, and followup investigations are difficult once conflicts take place.

Aboriginal Art Australia  - White Man Dreaming
The Gove Peninsula in Australia’s Northern Territory is a focal point for Aboriginal art and culture in the 94,000 sq km expanse of Arnhem Land, a place where many indigenous people only met white men for the first time little more than 70 years ago.

Aboriginal Art Australia  - White Man Dreaming

The Gove Peninsula in Australia’s Northern Territory is a focal point for Aboriginal art and culture in the 94,000 sq km expanse of Arnhem Land, a place where many indigenous people only met white men for the first time little more than 70 years ago.

An indigenous child from Kayapo tribe attends first indigenous assembly for the Rio+20 Conference at Kari-Oca village in Rio de Janeiro, on June 14, 2012. Indigenous people from around the world are visiting the village for the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development.
(Reuters/Ricardo Moraes)

An indigenous child from Kayapo tribe attends first indigenous assembly for the Rio+20 Conference at Kari-Oca village in Rio de Janeiro, on June 14, 2012. Indigenous people from around the world are visiting the village for the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development.

(Reuters/Ricardo Moraes)

 Indigenous Amazonian
I have been told this is not a member of the Guarani Tribe, but I took it off the caption on Flickr - apologies if it offended anyone.  
The beauty of the woman remains the same to me.  I did the tineye search and find this picture listed under several tribal groups - so suffice to say, a South American beauty.
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"Guarani Beauty from the Jungles of Ecuador -  Guarani. Last Amazon Indians
In Ecuador, home to one of the last, now a small number of South American tribes. Peace-loving people, as before, living in harmony with nature and trying to save their land from the advance of civilization.
Nik249@Flickr”

 Indigenous Amazonian

I have been told this is not a member of the Guarani Tribe, but I took it off the caption on Flickr - apologies if it offended anyone.  

The beauty of the woman remains the same to me.  I did the tineye search and find this picture listed under several tribal groups - so suffice to say, a South American beauty.

————————————————————————————————-

"Guarani Beauty from the Jungles of Ecuador -  Guarani. Last Amazon Indians

In Ecuador, home to one of the last, now a small number of South American tribes. Peace-loving people, as before, living in harmony with nature and trying to save their land from the advance of civilization.

Nik249@Flickr”