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The Belgian Blue - 

If you never seen a Belgian Blue, it appearance may blow your mind. the Beligan Blue is a breed of cattle originally from belgium. The Belgian Blue has  sculpted, heavily muscled appearance. The reason of such Extreme muscle development is not the result of genetic modification but a mutation in one of the breed’s genes which products what is known as double-muscling.

appalachian-appreciation:

The Blue People of Kentucky
The Fugate family gained fame for their rare genetic disorder that caused their skin to appear blue. Their ancestral line began six generations earlier with a French orphan, Martin Fugate, who settled in Eastern Kentucky. Martin Fugate came to Troublesome Creek from France in 1820 and family folklore says he was blue. He married Elizabeth Smith, who just happened to carry the rare recessive gene. Of their seven children, four were reported to be blue. There were no railroads and few roads outside the region, so the community remained small and isolated. The Fugates married other Fugate cousins and families who lived nearby, with names like Combs, Smith, Ritchie and Stacy.
The disorder that was passed down genetically was “methemoglobinemia” - a blood disorder in which an abnormal amount of methemoglobin — a form of hemoglobin — is produced. Hemoglobin is responsible for distributing oxygen to the body. In methemoglobinemia, the hemoglobin is unable to carry oxygen and it also makes it difficult for unaffected hemoglobin to release oxygen effectively to body tissues. Patients’ lips are purple, the skin looks blue and the blood is “chocolate colored” because it is not oxygenated. Most people have less than 1% methemoglobin in their blood, but this condition causes families like the Fugates to have anywhere up to 20% without having other serious health issues. 
Nothing like the Blue Fugates of Kentucky to demonstrate how absolutely fascinating genetics can be!

HH:  I had to read up on the history of this.  Genetics is fascinating.
"The bluest of the bunch was Luna, and she lived a healthy life, bearing 13 children before she died at the age of 84." (from first link below)
http://gma.yahoo.com/fugates-kentucky-skin-bluer-lake-louise-200247843—abc-news.html
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kyperry3/Blue_Fugates_Troublesome_Creek.html
Good reason for widening the gene pool.  Like the Navajo have always practiced, you do not marry within your own clan.  

appalachian-appreciation:

The Blue People of Kentucky

The Fugate family gained fame for their rare genetic disorder that caused their skin to appear blue. Their ancestral line began six generations earlier with a French orphan, Martin Fugate, who settled in Eastern Kentucky. Martin Fugate came to Troublesome Creek from France in 1820 and family folklore says he was blue. He married Elizabeth Smith, who just happened to carry the rare recessive gene. Of their seven children, four were reported to be blue. There were no railroads and few roads outside the region, so the community remained small and isolated. The Fugates married other Fugate cousins and families who lived nearby, with names like Combs, Smith, Ritchie and Stacy.

The disorder that was passed down genetically was “methemoglobinemia” - a blood disorder in which an abnormal amount of methemoglobin — a form of hemoglobin — is produced. Hemoglobin is responsible for distributing oxygen to the body. In methemoglobinemia, the hemoglobin is unable to carry oxygen and it also makes it difficult for unaffected hemoglobin to release oxygen effectively to body tissues. Patients’ lips are purple, the skin looks blue and the blood is “chocolate colored” because it is not oxygenated. Most people have less than 1% methemoglobin in their blood, but this condition causes families like the Fugates to have anywhere up to 20% without having other serious health issues. 

Nothing like the Blue Fugates of Kentucky to demonstrate how absolutely fascinating genetics can be!

HH:  I had to read up on the history of this.  Genetics is fascinating.

"The bluest of the bunch was Luna, and she lived a healthy life, bearing 13 children before she died at the age of 84." (from first link below)

Good reason for widening the gene pool.  Like the Navajo have always practiced, you do not marry within your own clan.  

black and white cookie goats

black and white cookie goats

Signs Humans are still evolving - 
http://www.mentalfloss.com/article/30795/5-signs-humans-are-still-evolving
Originally, we all had brown eyes. But about 10,000 years ago, someone who lived near the Black Sea developed a genetic mutation that turned brown eyes blue. While the reason blue eyes have persisted remains a bit of a mystery, one theory is that they act as a sort of paternity test. “There is strong evolutionary pressure for a man not to invest his paternal resources in another man’s child,” says the lead author of a study on the development of our baby blues. Because it is virtually impossible for two blue-eyed mates to create a brown-eyed baby, our blue-eyed male ancestors may have sought out blue-eyed mates as a way of ensuring fidelity. This would partially explain why, in a recent study, blue-eyed men rated blue-eyed women as more attractive compared to brown-eyed women, whereas females and brown-eyed men expressed no preference.

Signs Humans are still evolving -

http://www.mentalfloss.com/article/30795/5-signs-humans-are-still-evolving

Originally, we all had brown eyes. But about 10,000 years ago, someone who lived near the Black Sea developed a genetic mutation that turned brown eyes blue. While the reason blue eyes have persisted remains a bit of a mystery, one theory is that they act as a sort of paternity test. “There is strong evolutionary pressure for a man not to invest his paternal resources in another man’s child,” says the lead author of a study on the development of our baby blues. Because it is virtually impossible for two blue-eyed mates to create a brown-eyed baby, our blue-eyed male ancestors may have sought out blue-eyed mates as a way of ensuring fidelity. This would partially explain why, in a recent study, blue-eyed men rated blue-eyed women as more attractive compared to brown-eyed women, whereas females and brown-eyed men expressed no preference.

Confused Baby Girl Meet Her Fathers Twin Brother For The First Time

HH:  My mother was an identical twin.  She and my aunt tried to fool us many times, but as we got older, we could always tell.

Albino Owl

Albino Owl

Studies show that at least half of the variation in intelligence quotient, or IQ, is inherited. Alex Nabaum

Studies show that at least half of the variation in intelligence quotient, or IQ, is inherited. Alex Nabaum

lascocks:

laughterbynight:

Dapple for sure (which is not exclusive to grey horses) and a sooty modifier. Possibly sooty buckskin. That seems to be the closest when I did a search. The intensity of the modifier varies so sometimes you barely see it and sometimes the horses look like they rolled in soot.

BEAUTIFUL BB
it looks like someone sprinkled salt in watercolor paint 

3175

lascocks:

laughterbynight:

Dapple for sure (which is not exclusive to grey horses) and a sooty modifier. Possibly sooty buckskin. That seems to be the closest when I did a search. The intensity of the modifier varies so sometimes you barely see it and sometimes the horses look like they rolled in soot.

BEAUTIFUL BB

it looks like someone sprinkled salt in watercolor paint 

3175

Visualizing Race, Identity, and Change  
http://proof.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/17/visualizing-change/
HH:  This is an excellent article and in our society, very timely.  America is the melting pot, but we still classify people by race, religion, ethnicity, gender and so on.  
Being bi-racial myself, I always struggle with that box on surveys - I generally check “other.”  Or the lesser desired choice of "prefer not to answer," until I see a suitable selection.
It’s a good read and an interesting dialogue for our times.

Visualizing Race, Identity, and Change  

http://proof.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/17/visualizing-change/

HH:  This is an excellent article and in our society, very timely.  America is the melting pot, but we still classify people by race, religion, ethnicity, gender and so on.  

Being bi-racial myself, I always struggle with that box on surveys - I generally check “other.”  Or the lesser desired choice of "prefer not to answer," until I see a suitable selection.

It’s a good read and an interesting dialogue for our times.

Tribe of Ghosts is an insightful and revealing project by photojournalist Jacquelyn Martin that presents portraits of mistreated and often abandoned albinos in Africa while simultaneously sharing their personal stories and revealing their unappreciated beauty. Spending three-and-a-half weeks in Tanzania, a nation known for having one of the highest counts of the genetic mutation, Martin focused her lens on people with albinism living at the Kabanga Protectorate Center—a protective retreat that some see as a boarding school of sorts.
Filled with many children, the center paints a picture of an unfortunate tale that many of them share. Due to the social discrimination and cultural legends about people with albinism, many of these people are forsaken and even attacked. Browsing through the series and reading Martin’s discoveries from each personal account reveals the horrors that these people, young and old, have endured in a society that rejects their genetic makeup and even hunts them down because of it. (Witch doctors seem to believe that their body parts can be used for magic potions.)
Some of the residents of Kabanga center were left there by their parents while others were sent by the government for their own protection. In some heart-wrenching stories, these people have even been attacked by groups led by their own relatives. While the situation remains dire, there is some hope with the younger generations who have shown interest in becoming teachers, lawyers, and politicians in an effort to aid and protect other people with albinism.

Tribe of Ghosts is an insightful and revealing project by photojournalist Jacquelyn Martin that presents portraits of mistreated and often abandoned albinos in Africa while simultaneously sharing their personal stories and revealing their unappreciated beauty. Spending three-and-a-half weeks in Tanzania, a nation known for having one of the highest counts of the genetic mutation, Martin focused her lens on people with albinism living at the Kabanga Protectorate Center—a protective retreat that some see as a boarding school of sorts.

Filled with many children, the center paints a picture of an unfortunate tale that many of them share. Due to the social discrimination and cultural legends about people with albinism, many of these people are forsaken and even attacked. Browsing through the series and reading Martin’s discoveries from each personal account reveals the horrors that these people, young and old, have endured in a society that rejects their genetic makeup and even hunts them down because of it. (Witch doctors seem to believe that their body parts can be used for magic potions.)

Some of the residents of Kabanga center were left there by their parents while others were sent by the government for their own protection. In some heart-wrenching stories, these people have even been attacked by groups led by their own relatives. While the situation remains dire, there is some hope with the younger generations who have shown interest in becoming teachers, lawyers, and politicians in an effort to aid and protect other people with albinism.

The Ocean Rose

The Ocean Rose

The Faroe Islands’ capital city of Torshavn - Roland Zihlmann/Shutterstock
Faroe Islands Aim to Sequence Genes of Entire Country
The country is offering whole genome sequencing to every citizen who wants it — a project that will chart the way for the future of genomic medicine.

Growing up in the Faroe Islands in the North Atlantic, Edmund Jensen battled an overpowering sense of fatigue. At age 10, he developed seizures in which his limbs would stiffen and his eyes would roll back in his head, but local doctors could never diagnose his condition. In August 2008, Danish doctors identified the genetic defect that prevented his body from maintaining adequate levels of carnitine, which plays a critical role in metabolism. By then, Jensen was 21, had close-cropped brown hair and a silver hoop through his upper ear. 
The day before he went to get his first prescription, he died of cardiac arrest. “Again and again, I look at his picture and cannot believe that it is true,” his father, John, wrote afterward.
Jensen’s death was followed by the death of his third cousin Margretha, along with a string of macabre news articles about this undiagnosed genetic condition that had been shattering families in the Faroes for decades. The deaths became a call to action for the country’s Health Ministry, which persuaded some 30,000 citizens — about three-fifths of the total population — to submit blood samples to its new Genetic Biobank. They were all screened for Jensen’s disease, called carnitine transporter deficiency (CTD), improving and potentially saving dozens of lives. The earlier deaths would have a larger impact, though, changing the very face of health care in the Faroes and setting it on a path to become a leader in genomic medicine.
http://discovermagazine.com/2013/julyaug/01-faroe-islands-aim-to-sequence-genomes-healthcare#.UcEp8_nVCz4

The Faroe Islands’ capital city of Torshavn - Roland Zihlmann/Shutterstock

Faroe Islands Aim to Sequence Genes of Entire Country

The country is offering whole genome sequencing to every citizen who wants it — a project that will chart the way for the future of genomic medicine.

  • Growing up in the Faroe Islands in the North Atlantic, Edmund Jensen battled an overpowering sense of fatigue. At age 10, he developed seizures in which his limbs would stiffen and his eyes would roll back in his head, but local doctors could never diagnose his condition. In August 2008, Danish doctors identified the genetic defect that prevented his body from maintaining adequate levels of carnitine, which plays a critical role in metabolism. By then, Jensen was 21, had close-cropped brown hair and a silver hoop through his upper ear. 

    The day before he went to get his first prescription, he died of cardiac arrest. “Again and again, I look at his picture and cannot believe that it is true,” his father, John, wrote afterward.

    Jensen’s death was followed by the death of his third cousin Margretha, along with a string of macabre news articles about this undiagnosed genetic condition that had been shattering families in the Faroes for decades. The deaths became a call to action for the country’s Health Ministry, which persuaded some 30,000 citizens — about three-fifths of the total population — to submit blood samples to its new Genetic Biobank. They were all screened for Jensen’s disease, called carnitine transporter deficiency (CTD), improving and potentially saving dozens of lives. The earlier deaths would have a larger impact, though, changing the very face of health care in the Faroes and setting it on a path to become a leader in genomic medicine.

    http://discovermagazine.com/2013/julyaug/01-faroe-islands-aim-to-sequence-genomes-healthcare#.UcEp8_nVCz4

White Giraffe. Photo Pinball PW @ Flickr

White Giraffe. Photo Pinball PW @ Flickr

DANIEL RADCLIFFE - trifecta tongue

DANIEL RADCLIFFE - trifecta tongue