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Summer storm rolls in over Angier Avenue and Driver Street in East Durham (North Carolina), at Sunset - Justin Cook
HH:  This picture almost makes me feel the electricity in the air.

Summer storm rolls in over Angier Avenue and Driver Street in East Durham (North Carolina), at Sunset - Justin Cook

HH:  This picture almost makes me feel the electricity in the air.

lightning and heat flashes

lightning and heat flashes

Electrifying Plants - Mesmerizing, Camera-Less Images of Electrocuted Flowers by Marina Galperina. It can take up to 150 attempts to capture one of these glowing, alien plant images — not to mention the risk of accidental electrocution with 80,000 volts. But look at the results! Beautiful. Fearless, patient San Francisco artist Robert Buelteman worked on his recent project at a biological preserve at Stanford. All of the images were created without a camera or computer wizardry.

Electrograph 

Electrograph 

A woman and her son sit inside the capsule of an electric tricycle as they drive along a main road in central Beijing, on March 15, 2012.(Reuters/David Gray)

A woman and her son sit inside the capsule of an electric tricycle as they drive along a main road in central Beijing, on March 15, 2012.(Reuters/David Gray)

Endless Electrical Grid

Endless Electrical Grid

Boost Your Brain’s Power With a 9-Volt Battery and Some Wet Sponges
By Sebastian Anthony on April 28, 2011 at 4:06 pm
It seems, with the help of a 9-volt battery, wire, crocodile clips, and wet sponges, you can increase your brain’s performance and, more importantly, return your brain to its younger, more malleable and learning-receptive state.
The technique, which is lumbered with the fantastic and slightly terrifying name of transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS), is similar to deep brain stimulation (DBS), but it doesn’t involve complex neurosurgery. TCDS runs a very small current — just 2 milliamps — into brain tissue just beneath your scalp; it’s non-invasive, and seemingly quite safe. By pumping electrons into the brain, neurons move a few millivolts towards ‘depolarization’, which makes them more sensitive, and thus reducing the time it takes signals to travel across your nervous system.
More importantly, though, this technique increases the plasticity of brain tissue, leaving it in a kind of ‘wet clay’ state after the electrical current has been removed. These wet clay neurons are much more likely to form new synaptic connections in response to stimuli, such as learning a new skill — or playing a video game. The performance boost is significant, too: a recent study at the University of New Mexico showed that tCDS could double the “learning and performance” of test subjects who were asked to play a video game.
The implications of such a technology are massive, and they’re not limited to performance and learning, either. Depending on which regions of the brain are stimulated, tCDS can increase your working memory and verbal fluency, or improve the motor function of stroke victims. It shouldn’t shock you to learn that the New Mexico study was funded by DARPA, too — they want to know if soldiers can be ‘supercharged’, and the awful answer seems to be a resounding yes. Interestingly, in case you were wondering, tCDS can also be reversed. If electrons are drawn out of the neocortex, then neurons become less sensitive, reducing the subject’s reaction time and ability to learn.
We won’t be rushing to try on any government-issued thinking caps, then…
Read more at Nature
Image source: M. A. NITSCHE ET AL. BRAIN STIM. 1, 206–223 (2008)
HH:  OKAY, SO WHO’S FIRST?
  • Boost Your Brain’s Power With a 9-Volt Battery and Some Wet Sponges
  • By  on April 28, 2011 at 4:06 pm

It seems, with the help of a 9-volt battery, wire, crocodile clips, and wet sponges, you can increase your brain’s performance and, more importantly, return your brain to its younger, more malleable and learning-receptive state.

The technique, which is lumbered with the fantastic and slightly terrifying name of transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS), is similar to deep brain stimulation (DBS), but it doesn’t involve complex neurosurgery. TCDS runs a very small current — just 2 milliamps — into brain tissue just beneath your scalp; it’s non-invasive, and seemingly quite safe. By pumping electrons into the brain, neurons move a few millivolts towards ‘depolarization’, which makes them more sensitive, and thus reducing the time it takes signals to travel across your nervous system.

More importantly, though, this technique increases the plasticity of brain tissue, leaving it in a kind of ‘wet clay’ state after the electrical current has been removed. These wet clay neurons are much more likely to form new synaptic connections in response to stimuli, such as learning a new skill — or playing a video game. The performance boost is significant, too: a recent study at the University of New Mexico showed that tCDS could double the “learning and performance” of test subjects who were asked to play a video game.

The implications of such a technology are massive, and they’re not limited to performance and learning, either. Depending on which regions of the brain are stimulated, tCDS can increase your working memory and verbal fluency, or improve the motor function of stroke victims. It shouldn’t shock you to learn that the New Mexico study was funded by DARPA, too — they want to know if soldiers can be ‘supercharged’, and the awful answer seems to be a resounding yes. Interestingly, in case you were wondering, tCDS can also be reversed. If electrons are drawn out of the neocortex, then neurons become less sensitive, reducing the subject’s reaction time and ability to learn.

We won’t be rushing to try on any government-issued thinking caps, then…

Read more at Nature

Image source: M. A. NITSCHE ET AL. BRAIN STIM. 1, 206–223 (2008)

HH:  OKAY, SO WHO’S FIRST?

Massive blackout leaves 4 million customers without power
Posted By: Alan Hagman Posted On: 7:15 p.m. | September 8, 2011
As the sun came up Friday morning, businesses were reopening their doors and life was returning to normal after an unprecedented power outage left about 4 million people in San Diego, Mexico and other parts of Southern California without power.  Southern California Gas & Electric announced early Friday morning that the company had worked through the night to successfully restore power to all 1.4 million customers by about 4:30 a.m  More than 4 million customers lost power during a blackout in the San Diego area Thursday afternoon. San Diego Gas & Electric officials said the outage appears to have originated in Arizona and the outages extended across Southern California and into Arizona and Baja California.
PHOTO - Candles at the Cafe - Robert Gauthier for Los Angeles Times

Massive blackout leaves 4 million customers without power

Posted By: Alan Hagman Posted On: 7:15 p.m. | September 8, 2011

As the sun came up Friday morning, businesses were reopening their doors and life was returning to normal after an unprecedented power outage left about 4 million people in San Diego, Mexico and other parts of Southern California without power. Southern California Gas & Electric announced early Friday morning that the company had worked through the night to successfully restore power to all 1.4 million customers by about 4:30 a.m More than 4 million customers lost power during a blackout in the San Diego area Thursday afternoon. San Diego Gas & Electric officials said the outage appears to have originated in Arizona and the outages extended across Southern California and into Arizona and Baja California.

PHOTO - Candles at the Cafe - Robert Gauthier for Los Angeles Times

Refrigeration of Produce WITHOUT Electricity

 

This is incredible idea is an extension of the pottery water cooling vessels used though the millennia.

Chris Gupta

Cool: Fridge Without Using Electricity!

This is Mohammed Bah Abba’s Pot-in-pot invention. In northern Nigeria, where Mohammed is from, over 90% of the villages have no electricity. His invention, which he won a Rolex Award for (and $100,000), is a refrigerator than runs without electricity.

pot-in-pot1.jpg

Here’s how it works. You take a smaller pot and put it inside a larger pot. Fill the space in between them with wet sand, and cover the top with a wet cloth. When the water evaporates, it pulls the heat out with it, making the inside cold. It’s a natural, cheap, easy-to-make refrigerator.

pot-in-pot3.jpg pot-in-pot4.jpg

So, instead of perishable foods rotting after only three days, they can last up to three weeks. Obviously, this has the potential to change their lives. And it already has — there are more girls attending school, for example, as their families no longer need them to sell food in the market.

Arnold Williams from hathaby.net commented on this in his weblog. He said:

QUOTE 
Brilliant ideas don’t need to be difficult to execute: here’s a case in point. The technology has been known for centuries, but WASN’T APPLIED TO THE PROBLEM. Notice that applying technology also has the effect of educating young people. 


Power
(both solar and electric energy)

Power

(both solar and electric energy)

Electric Light Show/HH -
Sometimes mistakes become beautiful, so I saved it.  I liked the colors and shapes.
 

Electric Light Show/HH -

Sometimes mistakes become beautiful, so I saved it.  I liked the colors and shapes.

 

Shocking Sign - Gosh, I wouldn’t want to be fined. 

Shocking Sign - Gosh, I wouldn’t want to be fined. 

Hairdo’s by Static Electricity 

Hairdo’s by Static Electricity 

River of Taxi Yellow - New York City, NY, USA.
Just looking at this picture and thinking about the electricity and energy contained in that one shot is wearing me out.  As exciting as I find a big city, I have to retreat to revitalize myself in solitude or refresh in a rural outting.

River of Taxi Yellow - New York City, NY, USA.

Just looking at this picture and thinking about the electricity and energy contained in that one shot is wearing me out.  As exciting as I find a big city, I have to retreat to revitalize myself in solitude or refresh in a rural outting.

Overhead

Overhead