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STAR GOES ROGUE IN UNTIMELY COLLISION

STAR GOES ROGUE IN UNTIMELY COLLISION

Paradox - (Image - Adam Cole / NPR)
Sun Goes Down. Up Comes A Mystery
 
by ROBERT KRULWICH

Here’s a question you probably didn’t know was a question: Why is the sky dark at night?

My daughter asked me this about 10 years ago. We were looking up at the night sky, and she said, “There’s lots of stars up there.” And I said, “Yes.”

Then she said, “Are there stars everywhere?” And I said there were. Then she said, “Well, if there are stars everywhere, all of them shining, why don’t they fill the sky and make the sky shiny?” In her mind, the sky, instead of being dark, should look like this, brightness everywhere.

MORE:  http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2012/10/10/162630285/sun-goes-down-up-comes-a-mystery

Paradox - (Image - Adam Cole / NPR) Sun Goes Down. Up Comes A Mystery by ROBERT KRULWICH Here’s a question you probably didn’t know was a question: Why is the sky dark at night? My daughter asked me this about 10 years ago. We were looking up at the night sky, and she said, “There’s lots of stars up there.” And I said, “Yes.” Then she said, “Are there stars everywhere?” And I said there were. Then she said, “Well, if there are stars everywhere, all of them shining, why don’t they fill the sky and make the sky shiny?” In her mind, the sky, instead of being dark, should look like this, brightness everywhere. MORE: http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2012/10/10/162630285/sun-goes-down-up-comes-a-mystery

Deep Space: NGC 6960 - The Witch’s Broom by Robert Franke (USA). Part of the Veil Nebula, the ‘Witch’s Broom’ is the glowing debris from a supernova explosion – the violent death of a massive star. Although the supernova occurred several thousand years ago, the gaseous debris is still expanding outwards, producing this vast cloud-like structure. In this image narrowband filters have been used to greatly increase detail while giving a reasonable representation of the nebula’s colour.Picture: Robert Franke

Deep Space: NGC 6960 - The Witch’s Broom by Robert Franke (USA). Part of the Veil Nebula, the ‘Witch’s Broom’ is the glowing debris from a supernova explosion – the violent death of a massive star. Although the supernova occurred several thousand years ago, the gaseous debris is still expanding outwards, producing this vast cloud-like structure. In this image narrowband filters have been used to greatly increase detail while giving a reasonable representation of the nebula’s colour.Picture: Robert Franke

Hubble Watches Star Clusters on a Collision Course
Astronomers using data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope caught two clusters full of massive stars that may be in the early stages of merging. The 30 Doradus Nebula is 170,000 light-years from Earth. What at first was thought to be only one cluster in the core of the massive star-forming region 30 Doradus has been found to be a composite of two clusters that differ in age by about one million years. The entire 30 Doradus complex has been an active star-forming region for 25 million years, and it is currently unknown how much longer this region can continue creating new stars. Smaller systems that merge into larger ones could help to explain the origin of some of the largest known star clusters. The Hubble observations, made with the Wide Field Camera 3, were taken Oct. 20-27, 2009. The blue color is light from the hottest, most massive stars; the green from the glow of oxygen; and the red from fluorescing hydrogen. Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and E. Sabbi (ESA/STScI)

Hubble Watches Star Clusters on a Collision Course

Astronomers using data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope caught two clusters full of massive stars that may be in the early stages of merging. The 30 Doradus Nebula is 170,000 light-years from Earth. What at first was thought to be only one cluster in the core of the massive star-forming region 30 Doradus has been found to be a composite of two clusters that differ in age by about one million years. 

The entire 30 Doradus complex has been an active star-forming region for 25 million years, and it is currently unknown how much longer this region can continue creating new stars. Smaller systems that merge into larger ones could help to explain the origin of some of the largest known star clusters. The Hubble observations, made with the Wide Field Camera 3, were taken Oct. 20-27, 2009. The blue color is light from the hottest, most massive stars; the green from the glow of oxygen; and the red from fluorescing hydrogen. 

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and E. Sabbi (ESA/STScI)

Stars in my Blueberries

Stars in my Blueberries

"We have loved the stars too fondly to be fearful of the night …"
Tombstone epitaph of two amateur astronomers.

From Cosmos - Travels in Space and Time, Carl Sagan

Stargazing at Night …

Stargazing at Night …

earth and stars - outstanding Serbian proverb

earth and stars - outstanding Serbian proverb

A Star is Born - posted by Sam Bathe for Fan the Fire

A Star is Born - posted by Sam Bathe for Fan the Fire

Cosmic Jewel  (photo from Discovery)

Cosmic Jewel  (photo from Discovery)

Starburst and Beach Grass On Turquoise
Pink Sherbet Photography at Flickr 

Starburst and Beach Grass On Turquoise

Pink Sherbet Photography at Flickr 

Loose Star  - Illustration by Allison Reuling

Loose Star  - Illustration by Allison Reuling

Pawn Shop Star  (HH)
(Phoenix,AZ)
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Pawn Shop Star  (HH)

(Phoenix,AZ)

The Bubble Nebula Credit & Copyright: Dave Jurasevich (Mount Wilson Observatory) Explanation: Blown by the wind from a massive star, this interstellar apparition has a surprisingly familiar shape. Cataloged as NGC 7635, it is also known simply as The Bubble Nebula. Although it looks delicate, the 10 light-year diameter bubble offers evidence of violent processes at work. Above and right of the Bubble’s center is a hot, O-type star, several hundred thousand times more luminous and approximately 45 times more massive than the Sun. A fierce stellar wind and intense radiation from that star has blasted out the structure of glowing gas against denser material in a surrounding molecular cloud. The intriguing Bubble Nebula lies a mere 11,000 light-years away toward the boastful constellation Cassiopeia. A false-color Hubble palette was used to create this sharp image and shows emission from sulfur, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms in red, green, and blue hues. The image data was recorded using a small telescope under clear, steady skies, from Mount Wilson Observatory.
The Bubble Nebula 
Credit & CopyrightDave Jurasevich (Mount Wilson Observatory

Explanation: Blown by the wind from a massive star, this interstellar apparition has a surprisingly familiar shape. Cataloged as NGC 7635, it is also known simply as The Bubble Nebula. Although it looks delicate, the 10 light-year diameter bubble offers evidence of violent processes at work. Above and right of the Bubble’s center is a hot, O-type star, several hundred thousand times more luminous and approximately 45 times more massive than the Sun. A fierce stellar wind and intense radiation from that star has blasted out the structure of glowing gas against denser material in a surrounding molecular cloud. The intriguing Bubble Nebula lies a mere 11,000 light-years away toward the boastful constellation Cassiopeia. A false-color Hubble palette was used to create this sharp image and shows emission from sulfur, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms in red, green, and blue hues. The image data was recorded using a small telescope under clear, steady skies, from Mount Wilson Observatory.


Quilling Star

Quilling Star