Pinterest
South America at HarvestHeart
HarvestHeart's avatar

Four Ayoreo-Totobiegosode men make first contact with the outside world in 2004, Paraguay.
Peru’s former president Alan Garcia has publicly suggested uncontacted tribes have been ‘invented’ by ‘environmentalists’ opposed to oil exploration in the Amazon, while another spokesperson compared them to the Loch Ness monster. In fact, there are more than one hundred uncontacted tribes around the world.
http://www.uncontactedtribes.org/evidence

Four Ayoreo-Totobiegosode men make first contact with the outside world in 2004, Paraguay.

  • Peru’s former president Alan Garcia has publicly suggested uncontacted tribes have been ‘invented’ by ‘environmentalists’ opposed to oil exploration in the Amazon, while another spokesperson compared them to the Loch Ness monster. In fact, there are more than one hundred uncontacted tribes around the world.

http://www.uncontactedtribes.org/evidence

659 stairs to the top, the Guatape Rock in Colombia

stevemccurrystudios:

This gaucho was photographed in Paraguay.
Current ExhibitionKunsthalle Erfurt, Germany
Juminkeko FoundationKuhmo, Finland
Upcoming Exhibitions
Alex Del Piero Gallery
Torino, Italy16 May 2014 through 31 August 2014
Beetles & Huxley GalleryLondon, UKMay 12 through June 7, 2014
Frederic Got Fine Art GalleryParis, FranceJune 2014
Theatre de la Photography et de l’ImageNice, France27 June 2014 through 28 September 2014

stevemccurrystudios:

This gaucho was photographed in Paraguay.

Current Exhibition
Kunsthalle Erfurt, Germany

Juminkeko Foundation
Kuhmo, Finland

Upcoming Exhibitions

Alex Del Piero Gallery

Torino, Italy
16 May 2014 through 31 August 2014

Beetles & Huxley Gallery
London, UK
May 12 through June 7, 2014

Frederic Got Fine Art Gallery
Paris, France
June 2014

Theatre de la Photography et de l’Image
Nice, France
27 June 2014 through 28 September 2014

magictransistor:

Stone Mask (Amalito Culture), Argentina, c.1000 AD.

magictransistor:

Stone Mask (Amalito Culture), Argentina, c.1000 AD.

libutron:

birdsonly:

Southern Screamer (2013 © Jesse Alveo)

Chauna torquata (Anhimidae), native to South America.
If you want to know why this bird is named screamer, listen here its call.

HH:  I played this and my budgies shut the hell up and looked nervous - they must have thought a larger bird was coming into their territory.

libutron:

birdsonly:

Southern Screamer (2013 © Jesse Alveo)

Chauna torquata (Anhimidae), native to South America.

If you want to know why this bird is named screamer, listen here its call.

HH:  I played this and my budgies shut the hell up and looked nervous - they must have thought a larger bird was coming into their territory.

Amazon Men - Photo and Comment by David Lazar:  Three men from the Dessana indigenous tribe in the Amazon, Brazil. I traveled by boat to reach this tribe who live on the bank of the river and still honour their traditional roots and customs.

Amazon Men - Photo and Comment by David Lazar:  Three men from the Dessana indigenous tribe in the Amazon, Brazil. I traveled by boat to reach this tribe who live on the bank of the river and still honour their traditional roots and customs.

Cartagena, Colombia - Filip Kulisev 

Cartagena, Colombia - Filip Kulisev 

Men’s adornment

Men’s adornment

Costa Rica - Osa rainforest tree. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler. 

Costa Rica - Osa rainforest tree. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler. 

Margarita Island (Isla de Margarita) is the largest island in the Venezuelan state of Nueva Esparta, situated off the northeastern coast of the country, in the Caribbean Sea. The capital city of Nueva Esparta, La Asunción, is located on the island. Primary industries are tourism, fishing and construction.

Margarita Island (Isla de Margarita) is the largest island in the Venezuelan state of Nueva Esparta, situated off the northeastern coast of the country, in the Caribbean Sea. The capital city of Nueva Esparta, La Asunción, is located on the island. Primary industries are tourism, fishing and construction.

Giant armadillos are “ecosystem engineers” according to researchers who tracked the use of the animals’ burrows in Brazil. The Pantanal Giant Armadillo Project aims to learn more about the secretive animals that spend 75% of their time underground in burrows dug out by their impressive claws.
Photo by Kevin Schafer
http://beta.masrawy.com//News
Biotropica: The Role of Giant Armadillos as Physical Ecosystem Engineers

Giant armadillos are “ecosystem engineers” according to researchers who tracked the use of the animals’ burrows in Brazil. The Pantanal Giant Armadillo Project aims to learn more about the secretive animals that spend 75% of their time underground in burrows dug out by their impressive claws.

Photo by Kevin Schafer

http://beta.masrawy.com//News

Olinguito - Photo Credit: Mark Gurney
In the cloud forests of Ecuador, scientists have “discovered” the olinguito, the first new carnivore species reported in the Western Hemisphere in 35 years.
The olinguito (Bassaricyon neblina) is a century-old case of missed connections. The furry, 2-lb. animal resembles its fellow olingos, which are sometimes called “cat monkeys” because they look like  house cats with long tails. But the orange-brown olinguito eluded classification by scientists for more than 100 years, despite being observed in the wild, ending up in museum collections and even being exhibited at the Louisville Zoo, the National Zoo and the Bronx Zoo in the 1960s and 1970s, according to a statement from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History.
More:  http://www.livescience.com/38920-olinguito-new-species-ecuador.html

Olinguito - Photo Credit: Mark Gurney

In the cloud forests of Ecuador, scientists have “discovered” the olinguito, the first new carnivore species reported in the Western Hemisphere in 35 years.

The olinguito (Bassaricyon neblina) is a century-old case of missed connections. The furry, 2-lb. animal resembles its fellow olingos, which are sometimes called “cat monkeys” because they look like  house cats with long tails. But the orange-brown olinguito eluded classification by scientists for more than 100 years, despite being observed in the wild, ending up in museum collections and even being exhibited at the Louisville Zoo, the National Zoo and the Bronx Zoo in the 1960s and 1970s, according to a statement from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History.

More:  http://www.livescience.com/38920-olinguito-new-species-ecuador.html

The Inca Trail of Peru - An ancient trade route linking the city of Cuzco to Machu Pichu.   The rugged topography of the area forced the Inca Trail to make detours around hills and between mountains. The result: miles and miles of stairs, in some cases very precarious, as the famous floating staircases.

One Section actually at Machu Picchu - Stairs carved into the rock that crowns a climb of about 360 metres from MachuPicchu itself.   In some parts, the ascent is complicated to pass through narrow sections, with small step and eroded steps. Climbing time is calculated to be between one hour and 90 minutes: 90 minutes climbing stairs. Only 400 tourists a day are allowed, and access is closed from 1pm, just in case.

HH:  At that altitude, I am guessing it would take me more than 90 minutes - and an oxygen tank.

 

Amazon rainforest. 
Despite being cut down at an alarming rate, it still covers 2.7 million square miles. Growing across nine different countries, it represents over half of the planet’s remaining rainforests, making it the largest and most biodiverse tropical rainforest in the world. 
Photograph: Theo Allofs

Amazon rainforest.

Despite being cut down at an alarming rate, it still covers 2.7 million square miles. Growing across nine different countries, it represents over half of the planet’s remaining rainforests, making it the largest and most biodiverse tropical rainforest in the world. 

Photograph: Theo Allofs

Cusco, Peru  ~ and  Uros Island, Peru