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A male polar bear, gently climbing up a cliff above the ocean, hoping to eat bird eggs. Off Orange Island, north of Novaya Zemlya, Russia. This bear was trapped on land and could not eat seals - which usually eats - because the sea ice melted around and retreated to the north due to climate change.
(Photo - Jenny Ross)

A male polar bear, gently climbing up a cliff above the ocean, hoping to eat bird eggs. Off Orange Island, north of Novaya Zemlya, Russia. This bear was trapped on land and could not eat seals - which usually eats - because the sea ice melted around and retreated to the north due to climate change.

(Photo - Jenny Ross)

The Road to World War III Runs through Ukraine
Posted on March 1, 2014 by Dave Hodges


The population of the Ukraine is 45 million and it has the second most robust economy in the former states of the former Soviet Republic. This, alone, makes the Ukraine important. However, the Ukraine’s importance extends far beyond these considerations.
In 1979, the Soviets invaded Afghanistan because they were hopeful of establishing a natural gas pipeline through the country and thus, make Russia a player in the energy business. Russia failed in this attempt. Despite losing the war in Afghanistan, the Russians pursued their policy of energy dominance under Putin. Subsequently, Russia has become a major player in the energy business in which Russia supplies much of Europe a healthy portion of its energy needs. Without the Ukraine, Russia becomes a significant purchaser of energy, not a seller. For both Europe and the Russians, the Ukraine is most important for its location, particularly as a transit state for energy. Nearly 25% of the European Union’s natural gas comes from Russia, and 80% of that gas passes through the Ukraine. Wars have been fought for far less important economic reasons.
http://www.dcclothesline.com/2014/03/01/road-world-war-iii-runs-ukraine/

The Road to World War III Runs through Ukraine

The population of the Ukraine is 45 million and it has the second most robust economy in the former states of the former Soviet Republic. This, alone, makes the Ukraine important. However, the Ukraine’s importance extends far beyond these considerations.

In 1979, the Soviets invaded Afghanistan because they were hopeful of establishing a natural gas pipeline through the country and thus, make Russia a player in the energy business. Russia failed in this attempt. Despite losing the war in Afghanistan, the Russians pursued their policy of energy dominance under Putin. Subsequently, Russia has become a major player in the energy business in which Russia supplies much of Europe a healthy portion of its energy needs. Without the Ukraine, Russia becomes a significant purchaser of energy, not a seller. For both Europe and the Russians, the Ukraine is most important for its location, particularly as a transit state for energy. Nearly 25% of the European Union’s natural gas comes from Russia, and 80% of that gas passes through the Ukraine. Wars have been fought for far less important economic reasons.

http://www.dcclothesline.com/2014/03/01/road-world-war-iii-runs-ukraine/

Ukraine leader calls Russia’s moves a ‘declaration of war’

Interim Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk urges Putin to pull back his troops as the new government in Kiev announces it is calling up military reservists and putting national police units on “high alert.”

"The Russians Are Coming …"  WWI
A long line of Russian troops marching westwards. September 1914.

"The Russians Are Coming …"  WWI

A long line of Russian troops marching westwards. September 1914.

Opening Ceremony 2014 Winter Olympic Games -  Fireworks Display

Opening Ceremony 2014 Winter Olympic Games -  Fireworks Display

Mother Photographs Her Kids and Animals In Beautiful Russian Countryside (Elena Shumilova)

The demonstration against the government, when 500 thousand people gathered on Manege Square in Moscow, March 10, 1991.

The demonstration against the government, when 500 thousand people gathered on Manege Square in Moscow, March 10, 1991.

Bears and Wolves - Close to the Russian-Finnish border

Berendeyki - Victor Vasnetsov, 1885

Berendeyki - Victor Vasnetsov, 1885

The Kokoshnik 

(From Russian Vogue) 

Kokoshniks were worn as early as in 10th-12th century and had quite a history since then. Together with other elements of traditional Russian costume they were banned by Peter the Great in order to modernize Russian social system, but only a few decades later Catherine the Great brought them back and officially made part of court dress. It is interesting that Catherine wasn’t  born Russian but there was hardly any ruler ever who would have done more for Russia.

 Russian Fashions

Russian Bear trying to sniff the contents of a tank of aviation fuel left in South Kamchatka Sanctuary

Mirror.co.uk http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/weird-news/junkie-russian-bears-high-sniffing-1771007#ixzz2TKItDQvZ 

Russian Choir

Russian Choir

A Russian Trolley -  Gorelov Dmitry

A Russian Trolley -  Gorelov Dmitry

Podborka

Podborka

Moscow Metro’s Komsomolskaya Station - Richard Anderson @ Flickr
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Moscow Metro’s Komsomolskaya Station - Richard Anderson @ Flickr

Moscow Metro Art
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