crashinglybeautiful:

"I believe we are endowed with a faculty of discernment that guides us to seek life-giving truths. When we encounter different faiths, we know exactly how to excavate and sift to find the jewels that lie at the heart of each tradition. Every religion contains a treasure trove of wisdom teachings and transformational practices, and each one is also burdened with divisive messages and a history of violence and oppression. The gems are our birthright, and this God-wrestling process is our legacy.
Contrary to the assumption that the inter-spiritual path is for those who lack conviction—spiritual dilettantes who dabble in the feel-good aspects of religion because they’re too lazy to cultivate the discipline required for “real” religious life—it requires tremendous rigor and courage to say “yes” to the beauty wherever we encounter it, and to say “no” to whatever generates the poison of “otheriz-ing.”
There is a subtle elitism—almost a violence—in the message that we have to “pick one path and go deep,” implying that following multiple points of entry to Spirit precludes depth. My own encounters in an array of religious contexts have been anything but shallow! And I am finding more and more people like me, who seem to be temperamentally incapable of choosing one way to God, to the exclusion of all others.
My guiding value is love. Wherever I find access to the teachings and practices of love—whenever I am drawn into a field of love in the context of religion—I enter, I drink, I allow myself to be changed by the encounter. These soul visits to the holy houses of a faith tradition not my own frequently have the effect of dissolving my preconceptions; I am delighted when that happens. I cherish not-knowing!”
–Mirabai Starr , author and adjunct professor of philosophy and world religions at the University of New Mexico-Taos, on practicing more than one tradition.
From "Interfaith Crucible: A Conversation with Mirabai Starr" in our new Fall Issue on spiritual practice.
via: parabola-magazine.

crashinglybeautiful:

"I believe we are endowed with a faculty of discernment that guides us to seek life-giving truths. When we encounter different faiths, we know exactly how to excavate and sift to find the jewels that lie at the heart of each tradition. Every religion contains a treasure trove of wisdom teachings and transformational practices, and each one is also burdened with divisive messages and a history of violence and oppression. The gems are our birthright, and this God-wrestling process is our legacy.

Contrary to the assumption that the inter-spiritual path is for those who lack conviction—spiritual dilettantes who dabble in the feel-good aspects of religion because they’re too lazy to cultivate the discipline required for “real” religious life—it requires tremendous rigor and courage to say “yes” to the beauty wherever we encounter it, and to say “no” to whatever generates the poison of “otheriz-ing.”

There is a subtle elitism—almost a violence—in the message that we have to “pick one path and go deep,” implying that following multiple points of entry to Spirit precludes depth. My own encounters in an array of religious contexts have been anything but shallow! And I am finding more and more people like me, who seem to be temperamentally incapable of choosing one way to God, to the exclusion of all others.

My guiding value is love. Wherever I find access to the teachings and practices of love—whenever I am drawn into a field of love in the context of religion—I enter, I drink, I allow myself to be changed by the encounter. These soul visits to the holy houses of a faith tradition not my own frequently have the effect of dissolving my preconceptions; I am delighted when that happens. I cherish not-knowing!”

–Mirabai Starr , author and adjunct professor of philosophy and world religions at the University of New Mexico-Taos, on practicing more than one tradition.

From "Interfaith Crucible: A Conversation with Mirabai Starr" in our new Fall Issue on spiritual practice.

via: parabola-magazine.

“Everything is backwards; everything is upside down. Doctors destroy health, lawyers destroy justice, universities destroy knowledge, governments destroy freedom, the major media destroy information, and religions destroy spirituality.”
~ Michael Ellner
Jinn are supernatural creatures, frequently found in Islamic folklore. This image by an unknown artist from the book “Ahsan-ol-Kobar,” illustrates a number of the menacing creatures.

Supernatural ‘Jinn’ Seen as Cause of Mental Illness Among Muslims

By Bahar Gholipour, Staff Writer   

Jinn are supernatural creatures, frequently found in Islamic folklore. This image by an unknown artist from the book “Ahsan-ol-Kobar,” illustrates a number of the menacing creatures.

Supernatural ‘Jinn’ Seen as Cause of Mental Illness Among Muslims

artofthedarkages:

Brass processional crosses (circa. 1100s-1400s) made to be held by monks and priests in Ethiopian ecclesiastical ceremonies.
All of them found at different monasteries in Ethiopia and currently on view at the Walters Museum in Baltimore.
Notice the details- are those animals? people? biblical allusions perhaps? 
Notice how both the structure and intricate designs on each cross differ and are alike- maybe there is more to the interlace and shapes than one may expect.
Zoom Info
artofthedarkages:

Brass processional crosses (circa. 1100s-1400s) made to be held by monks and priests in Ethiopian ecclesiastical ceremonies.
All of them found at different monasteries in Ethiopia and currently on view at the Walters Museum in Baltimore.
Notice the details- are those animals? people? biblical allusions perhaps? 
Notice how both the structure and intricate designs on each cross differ and are alike- maybe there is more to the interlace and shapes than one may expect.
Zoom Info
artofthedarkages:

Brass processional crosses (circa. 1100s-1400s) made to be held by monks and priests in Ethiopian ecclesiastical ceremonies.
All of them found at different monasteries in Ethiopia and currently on view at the Walters Museum in Baltimore.
Notice the details- are those animals? people? biblical allusions perhaps? 
Notice how both the structure and intricate designs on each cross differ and are alike- maybe there is more to the interlace and shapes than one may expect.
Zoom Info
artofthedarkages:

Brass processional crosses (circa. 1100s-1400s) made to be held by monks and priests in Ethiopian ecclesiastical ceremonies.
All of them found at different monasteries in Ethiopia and currently on view at the Walters Museum in Baltimore.
Notice the details- are those animals? people? biblical allusions perhaps? 
Notice how both the structure and intricate designs on each cross differ and are alike- maybe there is more to the interlace and shapes than one may expect.
Zoom Info
artofthedarkages:

Brass processional crosses (circa. 1100s-1400s) made to be held by monks and priests in Ethiopian ecclesiastical ceremonies.
All of them found at different monasteries in Ethiopia and currently on view at the Walters Museum in Baltimore.
Notice the details- are those animals? people? biblical allusions perhaps? 
Notice how both the structure and intricate designs on each cross differ and are alike- maybe there is more to the interlace and shapes than one may expect.
Zoom Info
artofthedarkages:

Brass processional crosses (circa. 1100s-1400s) made to be held by monks and priests in Ethiopian ecclesiastical ceremonies.
All of them found at different monasteries in Ethiopia and currently on view at the Walters Museum in Baltimore.
Notice the details- are those animals? people? biblical allusions perhaps? 
Notice how both the structure and intricate designs on each cross differ and are alike- maybe there is more to the interlace and shapes than one may expect.
Zoom Info

artofthedarkages:

Brass processional crosses (circa. 1100s-1400s) made to be held by monks and priests in Ethiopian ecclesiastical ceremonies.

All of them found at different monasteries in Ethiopia and currently on view at the Walters Museum in Baltimore.

Notice the details- are those animals? people? biblical allusions perhaps? 

Notice how both the structure and intricate designs on each cross differ and are alike- maybe there is more to the interlace and shapes than one may expect.

Pope Francis hugs a sick person in Saint Peter’s Square at the end of his General Audience in Vatican City, 06 November 2013.
Pope Francis tweeted earlier this year, “The Pope must serve all people, especially the poor, the weak, the vulnerable.” The photos really speak for themselves with regards to his genuine concern for humanity.

Pope Francis hugs a sick person in Saint Peter’s Square at the end of his General Audience in Vatican City, 06 November 2013.

Pope Francis tweeted earlier this year, “The Pope must serve all people, especially the poor, the weak, the vulnerable.” The photos really speak for themselves with regards to his genuine concern for humanity.

The maiden, the mother and the crone, meant to encompass the full power of the goddess, reflected in the moon’s cycles. The waxing moon represents the maiden; the full moon represents the mother; and the waning moon represents the crone.

The maiden, the mother and the crone, meant to encompass the full power of the goddess, reflected in the moon’s cycles. The waxing moon represents the maiden; the full moon represents the mother; and the waning moon represents the crone.

Tet Trung Nguyen or the Ghost Festival, on August 10, is a time when families give thanks to their ancestors. To ensure their spirits ascend through to the upper world, families place offerings in temples, and grand buffet tables are laid out in the open air, laden with regional delicacies, meats, rice dishes, and sweets. 

Tet Trung Nguyen or the Ghost Festival, on August 10, is a time when families give thanks to their ancestors. To ensure their spirits ascend through to the upper world, families place offerings in temples, and grand buffet tables are laid out in the open air, laden with regional delicacies, meats, rice dishes, and sweets. 

A Muslim woman reads a copy of the Koran at the Istiqlal mosque during the second day of ramadan in Jakarta, Indonesia, the world’s most populous Muslim-majority country.
(ADEK BERRY/AFP/Getty Images)

A Muslim woman reads a copy of the Koran at the Istiqlal mosque during the second day of ramadan in Jakarta, Indonesia, the world’s most populous Muslim-majority country.

(ADEK BERRY/AFP/Getty Images)

Prayer for Rain 

 Hindu priests, in cauldrons of water, make offerings in front of a fire while performing the ‘Parjanya Varun Yagam,’ a special prayer for rain, in the western Indian city of Ahmedabad. India’s monsoon rainfall was 43 percent below average in June, the weather office said, the weakest first month of the season in five years. 
Amit Dave/Reuters

Prayer for Rain 

 Hindu priests, in cauldrons of water, make offerings in front of a fire while performing the ‘Parjanya Varun Yagam,’ a special prayer for rain, in the western Indian city of Ahmedabad. India’s monsoon rainfall was 43 percent below average in June, the weather office said, the weakest first month of the season in five years.

Amit Dave/Reuters