Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts. There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature– the assurance that dawn comes after night and spring after winter. -Rachel Carlson
rhamphotheca:

Japan’s cherry blossom stone is a natural wonder
Meet the cherry blossom stone from Japan - one of the most striking natural rock formations in the world.
by Bec Crew
So-called because when you crack them open, their internal cross-sections look like tiny golden-pink flowers, cherry blossom stones (sakura ishi in Japanese) get their beautiful patterns from mica, which is a commonly found silicate mineral known for its shiny, light-reflecting surface. 
These flower patterns weren’t always made of mica. They started their existence as a complex matrix of six prism-shaped crystal deposits of a magnesium-iron-aluminium composite called cordierite, radiating out from a single dumbbell-shaped crystal made from a magnesium-aluminium-silicate composite called indialite in the centre. 
Hosted inside a fine-grained type of rock called a hornfels - formed underground around 100 million years ago by the intense heat of molten lava - cherry blossom stones underwent a second significant metamorphosis in their geological lifespan when they were exposed to a type of hot water called hydrothermal fluids…
(read more: ScienceAlert! - Australia/NZ)
images: John Rakovan et al.

rhamphotheca:

Japan’s cherry blossom stone is a natural wonder

Meet the cherry blossom stone from Japan - one of the most striking natural rock formations in the world.

by Bec Crew

So-called because when you crack them open, their internal cross-sections look like tiny golden-pink flowers, cherry blossom stones (sakura ishi in Japanese) get their beautiful patterns from mica, which is a commonly found silicate mineral known for its shiny, light-reflecting surface. 

These flower patterns weren’t always made of mica. They started their existence as a complex matrix of six prism-shaped crystal deposits of a magnesium-iron-aluminium composite called cordierite, radiating out from a single dumbbell-shaped crystal made from a magnesium-aluminium-silicate composite called indialite in the centre. 

Hosted inside a fine-grained type of rock called a hornfels - formed underground around 100 million years ago by the intense heat of molten lava - cherry blossom stones underwent a second significant metamorphosis in their geological lifespan when they were exposed to a type of hot water called hydrothermal fluids

(read more: ScienceAlert! - Australia/NZ)

images: John Rakovan et al.

HH:  Earth Burps ~~~

The mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan and its surrounding also hold a rich historical significance, filled with rock carvings, the volcanoes themselves and also a musical rock in the region called the ‘Gaval Dash’ which is only found in Azerbaijan (Gobustan state reserve) which is a large flat stoneformed by three supports and produces a tambourine like sound when it is struck.   -
 See more at: http://readanddigest.com/mud-volcanoes-natures-oddities/#sthash.0JO9lviD.dpuf
Zoom Info
HH:  Earth Burps ~~~

The mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan and its surrounding also hold a rich historical significance, filled with rock carvings, the volcanoes themselves and also a musical rock in the region called the ‘Gaval Dash’ which is only found in Azerbaijan (Gobustan state reserve) which is a large flat stoneformed by three supports and produces a tambourine like sound when it is struck.   -
 See more at: http://readanddigest.com/mud-volcanoes-natures-oddities/#sthash.0JO9lviD.dpuf
Zoom Info

HH:  Earth Burps ~~~

The mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan and its surrounding also hold a rich historical significance, filled with rock carvings, the volcanoes themselves and also a musical rock in the region called the ‘Gaval Dash’ which is only found in Azerbaijan (Gobustan state reserve) which is a large flat stoneformed by three supports and produces a tambourine like sound when it is struck.   -

See more at: http://readanddigest.com/mud-volcanoes-natures-oddities/#sthash.0JO9lviD.dpuf