DEEP SEA BEAUTY 

The Census of Marine Life - a ten-year effort by scientists from around the world to answer the age-old question, “What lives in the sea?”. It was an international effort to asses the diversity, distribution, and abundance of marine life that lives in our ocean, and the project offically concluded in October 2010.  

In this video co-produced by the Census of Marine Life and National Geographic, dive down to the depths of the ocean and observe some of the fascinating creatures that scientists documented during the Census.  Watch the piglet squid, snake pipefish, sea angel, and football octopod swim by your screen in this video.  

Explore the depths of the ocean on the Alvin, see a bigfin squid and learn more about deep ocean exploration in the Ocean Portal’s Deep Ocean Exploration section.

CREDIT: Census of Marine Life deep sea creature video co-produced by National Geographic

National Geographic Traveller by Eric Lafforgue
Born in 1964, Eric Lafforgue lives in Toulouse, France. Ever since he was a young boy he has been fascinated by far away countries and travelling. 

National Geographic Traveller by Eric Lafforgue

Born in 1964, Eric Lafforgue lives in Toulouse, France. Ever since he was a young boy he has been fascinated by far away countries and travelling. 

 
NAT GEO - SUPERCELL - Montana Thunderstorm
I don’t want to live in a place where transdimensional spaceworms can appear in the sky and blast superheated steam straight down onto innocent earthlings.
Supercell photo be Sean Heavey for National Geographic; click to convectenate. Tip o’ the kevlar umbrella to Astropixie.

 

NAT GEO - SUPERCELL - Montana Thunderstorm

I don’t want to live in a place where transdimensional spaceworms can appear in the sky and blast superheated steam straight down onto innocent earthlings.

Supercell photo be Sean Heavey for National Geographic; click to convectenate. Tip o’ the kevlar umbrella to Astropixie.


 
Frogs Evolve Teeth—Again
Mysterious re-evolution challenges evolutionary theory, scientists say.


 
Christine Dell’Amore
National Geographic News
Published February 10, 2011
Lower-jaw teeth in frogs re-evolved after an absence of 200 million years, a new study says. The discovery challenges a “cornerstone” of evolutionary thinking, according to experts.
Related articles
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/02/110209-frogs-teeth-evolution-science/
Discovery of Frogs with Teeth Changes Evolutionary Theory (newsy.com)
Frogs re-evolved lost lower teeth (news.bbc.co.uk)

 

Frogs Evolve Teeth—Again

Mysterious re-evolution challenges evolutionary theory, scientists say.

 

Christine Dell’Amore

National Geographic News

Published February 10, 2011

Lower-jaw teeth in frogs re-evolved after an absence of 200 million years, a new study says. The discovery challenges a “cornerstone” of evolutionary thinking, according to experts.