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Neil de Grasse Tyson - We Stopped Dreaming (Episode 1) 

Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia from space
Photograph by NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon
Detail view of Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula. This is a false-color satellite image, acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on March 10, 2010.

Related articles
Surfing Kamchatka (outsideonline.com)
Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia from space
Photograph by NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon

Detail view of Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula. This is a false-color satellite image, acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on March 10, 2010.

Phytoplankton Bloom in the Barents Sea
Photograph by NASA image courtesy Norman Kuring, NASA Ocean Color Group
In this natural-color image from August 31, 2010, the ocean’s canvas swirls with turquoise, teal, navy, and green, the abstract art of the natural world. The colors were painted by a massive phytoplankton bloom made up of millions of tiny, light-reflecting organisms growing in the sunlit surface waters of the Barents Sea. Such blooms peak every August in the Barents Sea.

Related articles
Plankton Bloom Colors Sea Off Russian Island (livescience.com)
Marine Plant Can Swim Away From Predators (theepochtimes.com)
Phytoplankton Bloom in the Barents Sea
Photograph by NASA image courtesy Norman Kuring, NASA Ocean Color Group

In this natural-color image from August 31, 2010, the ocean’s canvas swirls with turquoise, teal, navy, and green, the abstract art of the natural world. The colors were painted by a massive phytoplankton bloom made up of millions of tiny, light-reflecting organisms growing in the sunlit surface waters of the Barents Sea. Such blooms peak every August in the Barents Sea.

Space Shuttle Launch

Space Shuttle Launch

walking on the moon 

walking on the moon 

Hubble Watches Star Clusters on a Collision Course
Astronomers using data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope caught two clusters full of massive stars that may be in the early stages of merging. The 30 Doradus Nebula is 170,000 light-years from Earth. What at first was thought to be only one cluster in the core of the massive star-forming region 30 Doradus has been found to be a composite of two clusters that differ in age by about one million years. The entire 30 Doradus complex has been an active star-forming region for 25 million years, and it is currently unknown how much longer this region can continue creating new stars. Smaller systems that merge into larger ones could help to explain the origin of some of the largest known star clusters. The Hubble observations, made with the Wide Field Camera 3, were taken Oct. 20-27, 2009. The blue color is light from the hottest, most massive stars; the green from the glow of oxygen; and the red from fluorescing hydrogen. Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and E. Sabbi (ESA/STScI)

Hubble Watches Star Clusters on a Collision Course

Astronomers using data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope caught two clusters full of massive stars that may be in the early stages of merging. The 30 Doradus Nebula is 170,000 light-years from Earth. What at first was thought to be only one cluster in the core of the massive star-forming region 30 Doradus has been found to be a composite of two clusters that differ in age by about one million years. 

The entire 30 Doradus complex has been an active star-forming region for 25 million years, and it is currently unknown how much longer this region can continue creating new stars. Smaller systems that merge into larger ones could help to explain the origin of some of the largest known star clusters. The Hubble observations, made with the Wide Field Camera 3, were taken Oct. 20-27, 2009. The blue color is light from the hottest, most massive stars; the green from the glow of oxygen; and the red from fluorescing hydrogen. 

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and E. Sabbi (ESA/STScI)

NASA astronaut Joe Acaba captured this image of Aurora Australis, also known as the Southern Lights, from the Tranquility node on the International Space Station, flying an altitude of approximately 240 milesPicture: Joe Acaba/NASA/AP

NASA astronaut Joe Acaba captured this image of Aurora Australis, also known as the Southern Lights, from the Tranquility node on the International Space Station, flying an altitude of approximately 240 milesPicture: Joe Acaba/NASA/AP

Measures of Time
One of my mother’s repeated expressions was:  ”Time stops for no man.”
She had that one right. 

Measures of Time

One of my mother’s repeated expressions was:  ”Time stops for no man.”

She had that one right. 

Palm Islands, Dubai, September 18, 2006. (NASA / GSFC / METI / ERSDAC / JAROS, and the US / Japan ASTER Science Team)

Palm Islands, Dubai, September 18, 2006. (NASA / GSFC / METI / ERSDAC / JAROS, and the US / Japan ASTER Science Team)

Irrawaddy Delta, Myanmar. About 60% of rice grown in the country in four states, located in the Irrawaddy delta. (NASA image by Robert Simmon, based on Landsat-7 data from the USGS Global Visualization Viewer)

Irrawaddy Delta, Myanmar. About 60% of rice grown in the country in four states, located in the Irrawaddy delta. (NASA image by Robert Simmon, based on Landsat-7 data from the USGS Global Visualization Viewer)

HH: Space Graffiti -
"Inside NASA’s Orbiter Processing Facility-1 in Florida, among hundreds of signatures, technicians transfer seats to the middeck of space shuttle Discovery for installation, on February 14, 2012. (NASA/Jim Grossmann)"

HH: Space Graffiti -

"Inside NASA’s Orbiter Processing Facility-1 in Florida, among hundreds of signatures, technicians transfer seats to the middeck of space shuttle Discovery for installation, on February 14, 2012. (NASA/Jim Grossmann)"

Moon and Venus - by Kaplan ~ NASA photos 

Moon and Venus - by Kaplan ~ NASA photos 

Lights of India
This stunning NASA photo has recently resurfaced and is making the rounds online. While speculation about the picture varies, we contacted the NASA media research office and they dug up the original for us with an explanation.
The photo is an overlay of shots highlighting India’s burgeoning population over several years. The white lights were the only illumination visible before 1992. The blue lights appeared in 1992. The green lights in 1998. And the red lights appeared in 2003.
Current speculation suggests the lights are a result of the Hindu celebration Diwali, or the celebration of lights, held from mid-October to mid-November, but NASA was unable to confirm what time of year the shots were taken.
The wonderfully helpful Gwen at NASA says there are no more recent versions available.
Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/this-amazing-photo-of-nightime-india-2011-10#ixzz1etwyXkDS
Related articles
What Does This NASA Photo of India Really Portray? (core77.com)

Lights of India

This stunning NASA photo has recently resurfaced and is making the rounds online. While speculation about the picture varies, we contacted the NASA media research office and they dug up the original for us with an explanation.

The photo is an overlay of shots highlighting India’s burgeoning population over several years. The white lights were the only illumination visible before 1992. The blue lights appeared in 1992. The green lights in 1998. And the red lights appeared in 2003.

Current speculation suggests the lights are a result of the Hindu celebration Diwali, or the celebration of lights, held from mid-October to mid-November, but NASA was unable to confirm what time of year the shots were taken.

The wonderfully helpful Gwen at NASA says there are no more recent versions available.



Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/this-amazing-photo-of-nightime-india-2011-10#ixzz1etwyXkDS

An Earth Burp - 
Sarychev Peak ~ NASA photos

An Earth Burp - 

Sarychev Peak ~ NASA photos