Showing posts tagged NASA

SPOOKY EYES: These ice-blue eyes are the centers of merging galaxies, NGC 2207 and IC 2163, with their spiral arms forming a mask. They have been interacting for around 40 million years in the Canis Major constellation about 140 million light-years away. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/STScI/Vassar)

SPOOKY EYES: These ice-blue eyes are the centers of merging galaxies, NGC 2207 and IC 2163, with their spiral arms forming a mask. They have been interacting for around 40 million years in the Canis Major constellation about 140 million light-years away. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/STScI/Vassar)

Jeff Schmaltz / NASA MODIS / GSFC

This outer-space view of southwest Alaska was captured on Nov. 21 by the MODIS imager on NASA’s Aqua satellite.

Jeff Schmaltz / NASA MODIS / GSFC

This outer-space view of southwest Alaska was captured on Nov. 21 by the MODIS imager on NASA’s Aqua satellite.

Phytoplankton Bloom in the Barents Sea
Photograph by NASA image courtesy Norman Kuring, NASA Ocean Color Group
In this natural-color image from August 31, 2010, the ocean’s canvas swirls with turquoise, teal, navy, and green, the abstract art of the natural world. The colors were painted by a massive phytoplankton bloom made up of millions of tiny, light-reflecting organisms growing in the sunlit surface waters of the Barents Sea. Such blooms peak every August in the Barents Sea.

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Phytoplankton Bloom in the Barents Sea

In this natural-color image from August 31, 2010, the ocean’s canvas swirls with turquoise, teal, navy, and green, the abstract art of the natural world. The colors were painted by a massive phytoplankton bloom made up of millions of tiny, light-reflecting organisms growing in the sunlit surface waters of the Barents Sea. Such blooms peak every August in the Barents Sea.

Hubble Watches Star Clusters on a Collision Course
Astronomers using data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope caught two clusters full of massive stars that may be in the early stages of merging. The 30 Doradus Nebula is 170,000 light-years from Earth. What at first was thought to be only one cluster in the core of the massive star-forming region 30 Doradus has been found to be a composite of two clusters that differ in age by about one million years. The entire 30 Doradus complex has been an active star-forming region for 25 million years, and it is currently unknown how much longer this region can continue creating new stars. Smaller systems that merge into larger ones could help to explain the origin of some of the largest known star clusters. The Hubble observations, made with the Wide Field Camera 3, were taken Oct. 20-27, 2009. The blue color is light from the hottest, most massive stars; the green from the glow of oxygen; and the red from fluorescing hydrogen. Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and E. Sabbi (ESA/STScI)

Hubble Watches Star Clusters on a Collision Course

Astronomers using data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope caught two clusters full of massive stars that may be in the early stages of merging. The 30 Doradus Nebula is 170,000 light-years from Earth. What at first was thought to be only one cluster in the core of the massive star-forming region 30 Doradus has been found to be a composite of two clusters that differ in age by about one million years. 

The entire 30 Doradus complex has been an active star-forming region for 25 million years, and it is currently unknown how much longer this region can continue creating new stars. Smaller systems that merge into larger ones could help to explain the origin of some of the largest known star clusters. The Hubble observations, made with the Wide Field Camera 3, were taken Oct. 20-27, 2009. The blue color is light from the hottest, most massive stars; the green from the glow of oxygen; and the red from fluorescing hydrogen. 

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and E. Sabbi (ESA/STScI)

Measures of Time
One of my mother’s repeated expressions was:  ”Time stops for no man.”
She had that one right. 

Measures of Time

One of my mother’s repeated expressions was:  ”Time stops for no man.”

She had that one right. 

Palm Islands, Dubai, September 18, 2006. (NASA / GSFC / METI / ERSDAC / JAROS, and the US / Japan ASTER Science Team)

Palm Islands, Dubai, September 18, 2006. (NASA / GSFC / METI / ERSDAC / JAROS, and the US / Japan ASTER Science Team)