Olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) nesting on escobilla, Oaxaca, Mexico.  Photo by Claudio Giovenzana 

Olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) nesting on escobilla, Oaxaca, Mexico.  Photo by Claudio Giovenzana 

Xilitla- Edward James a lover of the surliest movement moved to Mexico after the Second World War and built this Surliest castle in Xilitla. 

Xilitla- Edward James a lover of the surliest movement moved to Mexico after the Second World War and built this Surliest castle in Xilitla. 

50 Shades of Ray
Photograph by Eduardo Lopez Negrete
A large school of mobula rays fades into the waters of Baja, Mexico. “The rays were moving quite fast and it was hard enough keeping up with them from the surface, let alone diving down to take a closer look,” writes photographer Eduardo Lopez Negrete. Mobula rays are often referred to as flying rays due to their fondness for breaching.
This photo and caption were submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest. Winners will be announced July 31.

HH:  I haven’t seen all the entries, but this is magnificent and a giche captioned name to boot.

50 Shades of Ray

Photograph by Eduardo Lopez Negrete

A large school of mobula rays fades into the waters of Baja, Mexico. “The rays were moving quite fast and it was hard enough keeping up with them from the surface, let alone diving down to take a closer look,” writes photographer Eduardo Lopez Negrete. Mobula rays are often referred to as flying rays due to their fondness for breaching.

This photo and caption were submitted to the 2014 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest. Winners will be announced July 31.

HH:  I haven’t seen all the entries, but this is magnificent and a giche captioned name to boot.

Volleyball in Naco ————————                          Reuters/Jeff Topping
Residents of Naco, Arizona join residents of Naco, Mexico for a volleyball match during the fourth “Fiesta Bi-Nacional” at the fence that separates the U.S. (left) and Mexico (right), on April 14, 2007.
Volleyball in Naco ————————                          Reuters/Jeff Topping

Residents of Naco, Arizona join residents of Naco, Mexico for a volleyball match during the fourth “Fiesta Bi-Nacional” at the fence that separates the U.S. (left) and Mexico (right), on April 14, 2007.

Untamed Americas - Gigantic School of Rays

National Geographic filmed this gigantic school of mobula rays that had arrived off the coast of Baja. They seem so full of life, a truly sight for nature lovers.  

A cave diver inspects the newly-discovered skull of Naia in a submerged cave on the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico        (Photo - Daniel Riordan Araujo)
One of the oldest human skeletons in North America has been discovered by a team of international scientists in an underwater Yucatán Peninsula cave.
Named “Naia”, the teenager fell to her death in a large pit called Hoyo Nego, meaning “black hole” in Spanish.
Patricia Beddows, a cave-diving researcher from Northwestern University, said: ”The preservation of all the bones in this deep water-filled cave is amazing - the bones are beautifully laid out.”
"The girl’s skeleton is exceptionally complete because of the environment in which she died — she ended up in the right water and in a quiet place without any soil. Her pristine preservation enabled our team to extract enough DNA to determine her shared genetic code with modern Native Americans," she added.
The skeleton, which is now covered in water, is estimated to be between 12,000 and 13,000 years old, suggesting Naia lived in the late Pleistocene or last ice age.
Naia measured 4ft 10in tall and was delicately built. Her estimated age of death was 15 or 16 years old, based on the development of her teeth.
The near-complete human skeleton, which has an intact cranium and preserved DNA, was found lying 130ft below sea level near a variety of extinct animals, including an elephant-like creature and relative of the mastodon called a gomphothere. These remains helped scientists establish the age of the skeleton.

A cave diver inspects the newly-discovered skull of Naia in a submerged cave on the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico        (Photo - Daniel Riordan Araujo)

One of the oldest human skeletons in North America has been discovered by a team of international scientists in an underwater Yucatán Peninsula cave.

Named “Naia”, the teenager fell to her death in a large pit called Hoyo Nego, meaning “black hole” in Spanish.

Patricia Beddows, a cave-diving researcher from Northwestern University, said: ”The preservation of all the bones in this deep water-filled cave is amazing - the bones are beautifully laid out.”

"The girl’s skeleton is exceptionally complete because of the environment in which she died — she ended up in the right water and in a quiet place without any soil. Her pristine preservation enabled our team to extract enough DNA to determine her shared genetic code with modern Native Americans," she added.

The skeleton, which is now covered in water, is estimated to be between 12,000 and 13,000 years old, suggesting Naia lived in the late Pleistocene or last ice age.

Naia measured 4ft 10in tall and was delicately built. Her estimated age of death was 15 or 16 years old, based on the development of her teeth.

The near-complete human skeleton, which has an intact cranium and preserved DNA, was found lying 130ft below sea level near a variety of extinct animals, including an elephant-like creature and relative of the mastodon called a gomphothere. These remains helped scientists establish the age of the skeleton.

Great Convention in Irapuato, Guanajuato, League Coordinator, Member of the PNR. December 13, 1936, AGN.

Great Convention in Irapuato, Guanajuato, League Coordinator, Member of the PNR. December 13, 1936, AGN.