A THING OF BEAUTY COMPLETED, … IF ONLY FOR A MOMENT.
Tibetan Monks Painstakingly Create Incredible Mandalas Using Millions of Grains of Sand
A sand-painted mandala serves as a spiritual symbol. Shortly after it is made, it’s deconstructed. The destruction serves as a metaphor of the impermanence of life. As it states on the Drepung Loseling Monastery’s website, “The sands are swept up and placed in an urn; to fulfill the function of healing, half is distributed to the audience at the closing ceremony, while the remainder is carried to a nearby body of water, where it is deposited. The waters then carry the healing blessing to the ocean, and from there it spreads throughout the world for planetary healing.”
The article: 
http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/tibetan-buddhist-monks-sand-art
Zoom Info
A THING OF BEAUTY COMPLETED, … IF ONLY FOR A MOMENT.
Tibetan Monks Painstakingly Create Incredible Mandalas Using Millions of Grains of Sand
A sand-painted mandala serves as a spiritual symbol. Shortly after it is made, it’s deconstructed. The destruction serves as a metaphor of the impermanence of life. As it states on the Drepung Loseling Monastery’s website, “The sands are swept up and placed in an urn; to fulfill the function of healing, half is distributed to the audience at the closing ceremony, while the remainder is carried to a nearby body of water, where it is deposited. The waters then carry the healing blessing to the ocean, and from there it spreads throughout the world for planetary healing.”
The article: 
http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/tibetan-buddhist-monks-sand-art
Zoom Info
A THING OF BEAUTY COMPLETED, … IF ONLY FOR A MOMENT.
Tibetan Monks Painstakingly Create Incredible Mandalas Using Millions of Grains of Sand
A sand-painted mandala serves as a spiritual symbol. Shortly after it is made, it’s deconstructed. The destruction serves as a metaphor of the impermanence of life. As it states on the Drepung Loseling Monastery’s website, “The sands are swept up and placed in an urn; to fulfill the function of healing, half is distributed to the audience at the closing ceremony, while the remainder is carried to a nearby body of water, where it is deposited. The waters then carry the healing blessing to the ocean, and from there it spreads throughout the world for planetary healing.”
The article: 
http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/tibetan-buddhist-monks-sand-art
Zoom Info
A THING OF BEAUTY COMPLETED, … IF ONLY FOR A MOMENT.
Tibetan Monks Painstakingly Create Incredible Mandalas Using Millions of Grains of Sand
A sand-painted mandala serves as a spiritual symbol. Shortly after it is made, it’s deconstructed. The destruction serves as a metaphor of the impermanence of life. As it states on the Drepung Loseling Monastery’s website, “The sands are swept up and placed in an urn; to fulfill the function of healing, half is distributed to the audience at the closing ceremony, while the remainder is carried to a nearby body of water, where it is deposited. The waters then carry the healing blessing to the ocean, and from there it spreads throughout the world for planetary healing.”
The article: 
http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/tibetan-buddhist-monks-sand-art
Zoom Info
A THING OF BEAUTY COMPLETED, … IF ONLY FOR A MOMENT.
Tibetan Monks Painstakingly Create Incredible Mandalas Using Millions of Grains of Sand
A sand-painted mandala serves as a spiritual symbol. Shortly after it is made, it’s deconstructed. The destruction serves as a metaphor of the impermanence of life. As it states on the Drepung Loseling Monastery’s website, “The sands are swept up and placed in an urn; to fulfill the function of healing, half is distributed to the audience at the closing ceremony, while the remainder is carried to a nearby body of water, where it is deposited. The waters then carry the healing blessing to the ocean, and from there it spreads throughout the world for planetary healing.”
The article: 
http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/tibetan-buddhist-monks-sand-art
Zoom Info

A THING OF BEAUTY COMPLETED, … IF ONLY FOR A MOMENT.

Tibetan Monks Painstakingly Create Incredible Mandalas Using Millions of Grains of Sand

A sand-painted mandala serves as a spiritual symbol. Shortly after it is made, it’s deconstructed. The destruction serves as a metaphor of the impermanence of life. As it states on the Drepung Loseling Monastery’s website, “The sands are swept up and placed in an urn; to fulfill the function of healing, half is distributed to the audience at the closing ceremony, while the remainder is carried to a nearby body of water, where it is deposited. The waters then carry the healing blessing to the ocean, and from there it spreads throughout the world for planetary healing.”

The article: 

http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/tibetan-buddhist-monks-sand-art

Technological Mandala (computer and radio components)
Work from Italian-born, London-based artist Leonardo Ulian who carefully solders a myriad of computer components, circuitry and microchips to create these precisely symmetrical mandalas.

Technological Mandala (computer and radio components)

Work from Italian-born, London-based artist Leonardo Ulian who carefully solders a myriad of computer components, circuitry and microchips to create these precisely symmetrical mandalas.

Tibetan Sand Mandala 
Wikipedia: “The destruction of a sand mandala is also highly ceremonial. Even the deity syllables are removed in a specific order, along with the rest of the geometry until at last the mandala has been dismantled. The sand is collected in a jar which is then wrapped in silk and transported to a river (or any place with moving water), where it is released back into nature. For this reason, the materials keeping with the symbolism are never used twice.”

Tibetan Sand Mandala 

Wikipedia: “The destruction of a sand mandala is also highly ceremonial. Even the deity syllables are removed in a specific order, along with the rest of the geometry until at last the mandala has been dismantled. The sand is collected in a jar which is then wrapped in silk and transported to a river (or any place with moving water), where it is released back into nature. For this reason, the materials keeping with the symbolism are never used twice.”