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Inca Jaguar Drinking CupDating from the mid-16th to early 19th century, this wooden jaguar is an Inca qero, or ceremonial drinking cup, from Cusco, Peru. The jaguar embodied the fearless warrior in the highly stratified Inca society.
— Photograph by Carmelo Guadagno, copyright Smithsonian Institution/National Museum of the American Indian

Inca Jaguar Drinking Cup

Dating from the mid-16th to early 19th century, this wooden jaguar is an Inca qero, or ceremonial drinking cup, from Cusco, Peru. The jaguar embodied the fearless warrior in the highly stratified Inca society.

 Photograph by Carmelo Guadagno, copyright Smithsonian Institution/National Museum of the American Indian
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Jaguar Eye by Fat Steel Panda

funkysafari:

Jaguar Eye by Fat Steel Panda

Newborn at the Nicaragua Zoo
Jaguars are one of the most magical animals in the world. To some, jaguars look very much like leopards but they are heavier and larger. The easiest way to tell a jaguar from a leopard, besides the jaguar’s much larger body, is by the rosettes (dots on their fur).  The rosettes on a jaguar’s coat are larger, fewer in number, and usually darker with thicker lines. The head of the jaguar is rounder and it has shorter legs. Because of this the jaguar is sometimes called the “bulldog” of the cat world. 

Newborn at the Nicaragua Zoo

Jaguars are one of the most magical animals in the world. To some, jaguars look very much like leopards but they are heavier and larger. The easiest way to tell a jaguar from a leopard, besides the jaguar’s much larger body, is by the rosettes (dots on their fur).  The rosettes on a jaguar’s coat are larger, fewer in number, and usually darker with thicker lines. The head of the jaguar is rounder and it has shorter legs. Because of this the jaguar is sometimes called the “bulldog” of the cat world. 

Magnificence on four paws - black jaguar aka panther

Jag cleaning time

Jag cleaning time

The Jaguar Freeway

A bold plan for wildlife corridors that connect populations from Mexico to Argentina could mean the big cat’s salvation



Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/The-Jaguar-Freeway.html#ixzz2XlctLAsJ 
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

Jaguar Coat Pattern - gorgeous

Jaguar Coat Pattern - gorgeous

Jaguar enjoys a long drink of water - Brazil - Photo by Eraldo Peres 

Jaguar enjoys a long drink of water - Brazil - Photo by Eraldo Peres 

Snarling Jaguar

Snarling Jaguar

Momma Cats

Jaguar with newborn - Zoo in Yaduda, Jordon

Jaguar with newborn - Zoo in Yaduda, Jordon

What a face! - Jaguar - one of the beautiful big cats

What a face! - Jaguar - one of the beautiful big cats

Jaguar - panthera onca (el tigre)

Jaguar - panthera onca (el tigre)

The Border Fence - not just about people

Counties along the Mexico-United States border

The United States-Mexico border region is home to many endangered birds and animal species, including various owls, Mexican Gray Wolves, Black Bears, cougars and jaguars, whose inherent need to move around over a large area is essential to their long-term survival.  According to persons who are knowledgeable about biological diversity, the jaguars living today in southern Arizona probably came over the border from Mexico.  Similarly, “Mexican Gray Wolves, Peninsular Bighorn Sheep and other endangered species need to cross and re-cross their borderland habitat often,” observes Michael Finkelstein, director of the Tucson, Arizona-based Center for Biological Diversity.  “A manmade physical barrier that separates Mexico from the southwestern United States would crush the ability of these creatures to survive.”  The border region is an extraordinary source of biological diversity because it is shaped by a variety of ecological forms, including deserts, forests, plains, mountains and river valleys.

Black jaguar is carried by her mother - Peru

Black jaguar is carried by her mother - Peru