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Hubble Watches Star Clusters on a Collision Course
Astronomers using data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope caught two clusters full of massive stars that may be in the early stages of merging. The 30 Doradus Nebula is 170,000 light-years from Earth. What at first was thought to be only one cluster in the core of the massive star-forming region 30 Doradus has been found to be a composite of two clusters that differ in age by about one million years. The entire 30 Doradus complex has been an active star-forming region for 25 million years, and it is currently unknown how much longer this region can continue creating new stars. Smaller systems that merge into larger ones could help to explain the origin of some of the largest known star clusters. The Hubble observations, made with the Wide Field Camera 3, were taken Oct. 20-27, 2009. The blue color is light from the hottest, most massive stars; the green from the glow of oxygen; and the red from fluorescing hydrogen. Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and E. Sabbi (ESA/STScI)

Hubble Watches Star Clusters on a Collision Course

Astronomers using data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope caught two clusters full of massive stars that may be in the early stages of merging. The 30 Doradus Nebula is 170,000 light-years from Earth. What at first was thought to be only one cluster in the core of the massive star-forming region 30 Doradus has been found to be a composite of two clusters that differ in age by about one million years. 

The entire 30 Doradus complex has been an active star-forming region for 25 million years, and it is currently unknown how much longer this region can continue creating new stars. Smaller systems that merge into larger ones could help to explain the origin of some of the largest known star clusters. The Hubble observations, made with the Wide Field Camera 3, were taken Oct. 20-27, 2009. The blue color is light from the hottest, most massive stars; the green from the glow of oxygen; and the red from fluorescing hydrogen. 

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and E. Sabbi (ESA/STScI)

An Enigmatic Star Cloud from Hubble 

An Enigmatic Star Cloud from Hubble 

Boomerang Nebula
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope caught scattered light from the Boomerang  Nebula in images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys in early 2005. This  reflecting cloud of dust and gas has two nearly symmetric lobes of matter that  are being ejected from a central star. Each lobe of the nebula is nearly one  light-year in length, making the total length of the nebula half as long as the  distance from our Sun to our nearest neighbors - the alpha Centauri stellar  system, located roughly 4 light-years away. The Boomerang Nebula resides 5,000  light-years from Earth. Hubble’s sharp view is able to resolve patterns and  ripples in the nebula very close to the central star that are not visible from  the ground. (NASA, ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA) More (see  this on Google  Sky)

Boomerang Nebula

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope caught scattered light from the Boomerang Nebula in images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys in early 2005. This reflecting cloud of dust and gas has two nearly symmetric lobes of matter that are being ejected from a central star. Each lobe of the nebula is nearly one light-year in length, making the total length of the nebula half as long as the distance from our Sun to our nearest neighbors - the alpha Centauri stellar system, located roughly 4 light-years away. The Boomerang Nebula resides 5,000 light-years from Earth. Hubble’s sharp view is able to resolve patterns and ripples in the nebula very close to the central star that are not visible from the ground. (NASA, ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA) More (see this on Google Sky)

Image from the Hubble Telescope - found on stumbleupon
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Image from the Hubble Telescope - found on stumbleupon