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Depicted are the Gods Toth and Horus pouring oils over the Pharaoh in blessing.
Kom Obo Temple, Egypt.
This temple is of the Ptolemaic period, and not only is it dedicated to the crocodile god Sobek,  but it is also dedicated to Haroeris.

Depicted are the Gods Toth and Horus pouring oils over the Pharaoh in blessing.

Kom Obo Temple, Egypt.

This temple is of the Ptolemaic period, and not only is it dedicated to the crocodile god Sobek,  but it is also dedicated to Haroeris.

Tlaloc -  god of rain, fertility, and water. He was a beneficent god who gave life and sustenance, but he was also feared for his ability to send hail, thunder, and lightning, and for being the lord of the powerful element of water.
Source: Wikipedia

Tlaloc -  god of rain, fertility, and water. He was a beneficent god who gave life and sustenance, but he was also feared for his ability to send hail, thunder, and lightning, and for being the lord of the powerful element of water.

Source: Wikipedia

druidstone:

Tlaloc

HH:  Aztec diety

druidstone:

Tlaloc

HH:  Aztec diety

For thousands of years humans were oppressed – as some of us still are – by the notion that the universe is a marionette whose strings are pulled by a god or gods, unseen and inscrutable. Then, 2,500 years ago, there was a glorious awakening in Ionia: on Samos and the other nearby Greek colonies that grew up on the islands and inlets of the busy eastern Aegean Sea.

Suddenly there were people who believed that everything was made of atoms; that human beings and other animals had sprung from simpler forms; that diseases were not caused by demons or the gods; that the Earth was only a planet going around the Sun. And that the stars were very far away. This revolution made Cosmos out of Chaos.

Carl Sagan, Cosmos (via whats-out-there)
yeshecholwa:

Crown for an effigy of Mahākāla, a figure/deity in both Buddhism and Hinduism.

yeshecholwa:

Crown for an effigy of Mahākāla, a figure/deity in both Buddhism and Hinduism.

Boy dressed as Shiva by Glen Allison on Getty Images

Boy dressed as Shiva by Glen Allison on Getty Images

Isis - Goddess of Magic and Healing
Her power has been often the result of her use of magic. She learned magical charms from Thoth in order to restore life to Osiris, and she practiced them later when Horus was bitten by Seth’s scorpions. Throughout her life she used her magic on both friend and foe, and this secret knowledge gave her the reputation as a great healer of the sick, which lasted into the Christian era.

Isis - Goddess of Magic and Healing

Her power has been often the result of her use of magic. She learned magical charms from Thoth in order to restore life to Osiris, and she practiced them later when Horus was bitten by Seth’s scorpions. Throughout her life she used her magic on both friend and foe, and this secret knowledge gave her the reputation as a great healer of the sick, which lasted into the Christian era.

Kellan Lutz - Hercules

Kellan Lutz - Hercules

asylum-art:

Incredible Photography by Sathis Ragavendran

on Flickr

from Maha Shivaratri festival, Angalamman Temple, Kaveripattinam. gaken during “The Mayana Soora Thiruvizha” festival takes place every March in the small village of Kaveripattinam the day after Mahashivarathiri (The great night of Shiva). The festival is devoted to Angalamman, a fierce guardian deity worshipped widely in Southern India.

Asherah - Bas relief of Christian Mother Goddess Asherah, consort of YHWH

Asherah - Bas relief of Christian Mother Goddess Asherah, consort of YHWH

Sumerian banquet seal (2200-2100 BC): snake or naga (Gen. 3:15), Tree of Life (date palm), Asherah, and the God of the Bible. The snake eats the plant of eternal life, from the Huluppu Tree, in the Gilgamesh Epic, sloughing its skin and gaining “immortality.” [Dropping its body and gaining access to rebirth in heavenly realms by learning right from wrong?]

Sumerian banquet seal (2200-2100 BC): snake or naga (Gen. 3:15), Tree of Life (date palm), Asherah, and the God of the Bible. The snake eats the plant of eternal life, from the Huluppu Tree, in the Gilgamesh Epic, sloughing its skin and gaining “immortality.” [Dropping its body and gaining access to rebirth in heavenly realms by learning right from wrong?]

Monotheism Commences - the day GOD killed the other gods and goddesses

Psalm 82

A psalm of Asaph.

God presides in the great assembly;
    he renders judgment among the “gods”:

“How long will you defend the unjust
    and show partiality to the wicked? 
Defend the weak and the fatherless;
    uphold the cause of the poor and the oppressed.
Rescue the weak and the needy;
    deliver them from the hand of the wicked.

“The ‘gods’ know nothing, they understand nothing.
    They walk about in darkness;
    all the foundations of the earth are shaken.

“I said, ‘You are “gods”;
    you are all sons of the Most High.’
But you will die like mere mortals;
    you will fall like every other ruler.”

Rise up, O God, judge the earth,
    for all the nations are your inheritance.image

Ostara (1884) by Johannes Gehrts. The goddess flies through the heavens surrounded by Roman-inspired putti, beams of light, and animals. Germanic people look up at the goddess from the realm below.
Ēostre or Ostara (Northumbrian Old English: Ēostre; West Saxon Old English: Ēastre; Old High German: *Ôstara) is a goddess in Germanic paganism who, by way of the Germanic month bearing her name (Northumbrian: Ēosturmōnaþ; West Saxon: Ēastermōnaþ; Old High German: Ôstarmânoth), is the namesake of the festival of Easter. Ēostre is attested solely by Bede in his 8th-century work De temporum ratione, where Bede states that during Ēosturmōnaþ (the equivalent to the month of April) feasts were held in Eostre’s honor among the pagan Anglo-Saxons, but had died out by the time of his writing, replaced by the Christian “Paschal month" (a celebration of the resurrection of Jesus).
Source:  Wikipedia
HH:  Fairy Babies dropping from the sky - now that’s a fertility goddess.  Hanging with the stork too - more fertility symbols.

Ostara (1884) by Johannes Gehrts. The goddess flies through the heavens surrounded by Roman-inspired putti, beams of light, and animals. Germanic people look up at the goddess from the realm below.

Ēostre or Ostara (Northumbrian Old EnglishĒostreWest Saxon Old English: ĒastreOld High German*Ôstara) is a goddess in Germanic paganism who, by way of the Germanic month bearing her name (Northumbrian: Ēosturmōnaþ; West Saxon: Ēastermōnaþ; Old High German: Ôstarmânoth), is the namesake of the festival of Easter. Ēostre is attested solely by Bede in his 8th-century work De temporum ratione, where Bede states that during Ēosturmōnaþ (the equivalent to the month of April) feasts were held in Eostre’s honor among the pagan Anglo-Saxons, but had died out by the time of his writing, replaced by the Christian “Paschal month" (a celebration of the resurrection of Jesus).

Source:  Wikipedia

HH:  Fairy Babies dropping from the sky - now that’s a fertility goddess.  Hanging with the stork too - more fertility symbols.

thingsorganizedneatly:

selahtime:

eggs

Sam Kaplan

HH:  Ready for Easter - egg symbolism and celebrating new life -  Eostur, Eastar, Ostara, and Ostar.

thingsorganizedneatly:

selahtime:

eggs

Sam Kaplan

HH:  Ready for Easter - egg symbolism and celebrating new life -  Eostur, Eastar, Ostara, and Ostar.