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Dogs likely originated in Europe more than 18,000 years ago.


Wolves likely were domesticated by European hunter–gatherers more than 18,000 years ago and gradually evolved into dogs that became household pets, UCLA life scientists report.
“We found that instead of recent wolves being closest to domestic dogs, ancient European wolves were directly related to them,” said Robert Wayne, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology in UCLA’s College of Letters and Science and senior author of the research. “This brings the genetic record into agreement with the archaeological record. Europe is where the oldest dogs are found.”
The UCLA researchers’ genetic analysis is published Nov. 15 in the journal Science and featured on the journal’s cover.
More: http://www.heritagedaily.com/2013/11/dogs-likely-originated-in-europe-more-than-18000-years-ago/99713

Dogs likely originated in Europe more than 18,000 years ago.

Wolves likely were domesticated by European hunter–gatherers more than 18,000 years ago and gradually evolved into dogs that became household pets, UCLA life scientists report.

“We found that instead of recent wolves being closest to domestic dogs, ancient European wolves were directly related to them,” said Robert Wayne, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology in UCLA’s College of Letters and Science and senior author of the research. “This brings the genetic record into agreement with the archaeological record. Europe is where the oldest dogs are found.”

The UCLA researchers’ genetic analysis is published Nov. 15 in the journal Science and featured on the journal’s cover.

More: http://www.heritagedaily.com/2013/11/dogs-likely-originated-in-europe-more-than-18000-years-ago/99713

ratak-monodosico:

A Graph displaying the Survey Results: Q - “Human beings, as we know them, developed from earlier species of animals”?
Source

HH:  Superstitious Peoples    (8)

ratak-monodosico:

A Graph displaying the Survey Results: Q - “Human beings, as we know them, developed from earlier species of animals”?

Source

HH:  Superstitious Peoples    (8)

Was Earth’s first bird found?


The skeleton of a Jurassic dinosaur from China could also be the oldest known bird, scientists report.
The fossil of Aurornis xui was found last year in a museum at the Fossil and Geology Park in Yizhou, China, long after a farmer first dug it up in the Liaoning Province. The feathery specimen represents the most ancient of the avialans, the group that includes birds and their relatives since their split from nonavian dinosaurs.
[Full Story: New Feathered Dino May Be World’s First Bird]
Was Earth’s first bird found?

The skeleton of a Jurassic dinosaur from China could also be the oldest known bird, scientists report.

The fossil of Aurornis xui was found last year in a museum at the Fossil and Geology Park in Yizhou, China, long after a farmer first dug it up in the Liaoning Province. The feathery specimen represents the most ancient of the avialans, the group that includes birds and their relatives since their split from nonavian dinosaurs.

[Full Story: New Feathered Dino May Be World’s First Bird]

Evolutionary Clock - Illustrator Andreas Preis

Evolutionary Clock - Illustrator Andreas Preis

Spot on

Spot on

Telephone Evolution - submitted by Beth B.  She has a great sense of humor.

Telephone Evolution - submitted by Beth B.  She has a great sense of humor.

The universe doesn’t care what you believe.(Cartoon by Randall Munroe) 
 - this is quite great lol -

The universe doesn’t care what you believe.
(Cartoon by Randall Munroe

 - this is quite great lol -

Batman and Robin evolutionary psychology

Batman and Robin evolutionary psychology

"In the long history of humankind (and animalkind, too) those who learned to collaborate and improvise most effectively have prevailed." — Charles Darwin.
Evolutionary Footprint

Evolutionary Footprint

Evolution of the Wireless Phone

Evolution of the Wireless Phone

Wheel of Misfortune

Wheel of Misfortune

Nurture Growth - David Hale
2006
Acrylic, Marker on Canvas
2’ x 2’
Nurture Growth - David Hale
2006
Acrylic, Marker on Canvas
2’ x 2’