Showing posts tagged Deer

Tufted Deer
The Tufted deer (Elaphodus cephalopus) is a small species of deer found in high altitude forests of Burma and China. They have a prominent tuft of hair on their heads which gives them their name, but they also look like an adorable vampire. Their fangs are long upper canines, which are similar to what you’d find in their close relative the muntjac. They’re very territorial animals, and although they have small antlers the males use these sharp canines to fight over both territory and mates.
Photo - Wikipedia

Tufted Deer

The Tufted deer (Elaphodus cephalopus) is a small species of deer found in high altitude forests of Burma and China. They have a prominent tuft of hair on their heads which gives them their name, but they also look like an adorable vampire. Their fangs are long upper canines, which are similar to what you’d find in their close relative the muntjac. They’re very territorial animals, and although they have small antlers the males use these sharp canines to fight over both territory and mates.

Photo - Wikipedia

Deer graze in the foreground of this stunning image of the full Harvest Moon captured in 2013.
Photo:  ANTHONY LYNCH


The full Harvest Moon will light up the night sky on Monday (Sept. 8), and this year it comes with an extra bounty. September’s full moon will cap a trio of back-to-back “supermoons” for the Northern Hemisphere summer, according to NASA.
The moon will reach its full phase when it reaches the spot in the sky opposite from the sun. That moment will occur Monday at 9:38 p.m. EDT (0138 GMT). Monday’s full moon is the one nearest to the September equinox this year, giving it the moniker of Harvest Moon by the usual definition.
Although we associate the Harvest Moon with autumn, this year’s version is actually the last full moon of the summer season. The 2014 Harvest Moon comes about as early in the calendar as possible. However, Harvest Moons can occur as late as Oct. 7. [Amazing Photos of the 2013 Harvest Moon]

Deer graze in the foreground of this stunning image of the full Harvest Moon captured in 2013.

Photo:  ANTHONY LYNCH

The full Harvest Moon will light up the night sky on Monday (Sept. 8), and this year it comes with an extra bounty. September’s full moon will cap a trio of back-to-back “supermoons” for the Northern Hemisphere summer, according to NASA.

The moon will reach its full phase when it reaches the spot in the sky opposite from the sun. That moment will occur Monday at 9:38 p.m. EDT (0138 GMT). Monday’s full moon is the one nearest to the September equinox this year, giving it the moniker of Harvest Moon by the usual definition.

Although we associate the Harvest Moon with autumn, this year’s version is actually the last full moon of the summer season. The 2014 Harvest Moon comes about as early in the calendar as possible. However, Harvest Moons can occur as late as Oct. 7. [Amazing Photos of the 2013 Harvest Moon]

Pictured here in 1993, the Saola is one of the world’s most elusive animals. Photo: World Wildlife Fund/Associated Press

Pictured here in 1993, the Saola is one of the world’s most elusive animals. Photo: World Wildlife Fund/Associated Press


A Deer Migration You Have to See to Believe

Published on Apr 24, 2014

Researchers have only recently found the longest large mammal migration in the continental United States: Mule deer migrate 150 miles (241 kilometers) in western Wyoming each year. And it’s no easy task for them—barriers include highways, fences, tough terrain, and bodies of water. In this video by Joe Riis, a National Geographic grantee and regular contributor, see the modern-day obstacles mule deer overcome to make the migratory trek that they likely have been making for generations.

Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos selected by National Geographic’s editors:
http://video.nationalgeographic.com/v…

Learn more about the Wyoming Migration Initiative:
http://migrationinitiative.org/

What goes on when you are not there!

Alberta Parks 

Bears and critters gone wilder than wild at the scratching post