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The Butterfly Effect - clouds hovering over the sea - Comment and Photo by Vimal Raveendran 
This is one of the sights that I feel fortunate to have witnessed. This photo was taken when myself and some friends were hiking near the Murray’s Trail at Jervis Bay, Australia.
Instead of running after seeing the cloud pattern, I just stood there taking pictures. This is one of the many pictures taken before The clouds passed above our heads and it started to rain heavily.

The Butterfly Effect - clouds hovering over the sea - Comment and Photo by Vimal Raveendran 

This is one of the sights that I feel fortunate to have witnessed. This photo was taken when myself and some friends were hiking near the Murray’s Trail at Jervis Bay, Australia.

Instead of running after seeing the cloud pattern, I just stood there taking pictures. This is one of the many pictures taken before The clouds passed above our heads and it started to rain heavily.

 sky dragon

 sky dragon

Cloud Magic - photographer unknown

Cloud Magic - photographer unknown

Cloud Anvil

Cloud Anvil

Above the Fray

Above the Fray

rainbow cloud

rainbow cloud

Cloud cover in Capetown

Cloud cover in Capetown

A lenticularis with iridescence over Mount Rainier, Washington, US. - Image Credit and Copyright Ryan Verwest

A lenticularis with iridescence over Mount Rainier, Washington, US. - Image Credit and Copyright Ryan Verwest

Faroe Islands -  Litla Dimun Island

Faroe Islands -  Litla Dimun Island

Lone Thunderhead - Peoria, Arizona

Lone Thunderhead - Peoria, Arizona

Above the Fray … clouds

Above the Fray … clouds

Leaks in the Cloud Basket (Phoenix, Arizona)

Leaks in the Cloud Basket (Phoenix, Arizona)

Cloud

Cloud

Sea Cloud - Yevgen Timashov

Sea Cloud - Yevgen Timashov

 Altocumulus Clouds ~ Photographer: David Lynch
No color manipulation was performed on these photos; these are right out of the camera.Pictures taken on January 10, 2010. Field of view is about eight degrees. 
The cloud photos above showing brilliant hues and lovely color blending were captured above Topanga, California on January 10, 2010. All day long, Mother Nature sent wavy altocumulus clouds across the sky, delicate ripples and wispy mare’s tails dropping from the clouds. The mackerel sky was spectacular, punctuated by lacunosus, rafts of waves and fall streak holes. Best of all, as the altocumulus passed near the Sun, they lit up in a riot of colors, calledcloud corona (e). These are not related to the solar corona.
Cloud coronae colors are due to diffraction of sunlight by microscopic water droplets. When the droplets are all about the same size, which is a rarity in clouds because there’s usually a large range of particle sizes, their colors can be relatively pure and bright. Most colors occur in circular rings around the Sun. But when different parts of the cloud have groups of droplets, each with its own size range, the color distribution in the sky can be somewhat chaotic, with reds and greens intermingled. This effect is called commonly called irisation and can be seen many degrees from the Sun.  Cloud coronae are the brightest and most colorful of sky phenomena, easily outshining the rainbow andcircumzenithal and circumhorizontal arcs. They’re also very common, yet few people see them. Why? Because cononae are so close to the Sun, and most people don’t look in this direction. Be sure to block the Sun with your hand or something else and also wear sunglasses — these coronae are bright.

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 Altocumulus Clouds ~ Photographer: David Lynch

No color manipulation was performed on these photos; these are right out of the camera.
Pictures taken on January 10, 2010. Field of view is about eight degrees. 

The cloud photos above showing brilliant hues and lovely color blending were captured above Topanga, California on January 10, 2010. All day long, Mother Nature sent wavy altocumulus clouds across the sky, delicate ripples and wispy mare’s tails dropping from the clouds. The mackerel sky was spectacular, punctuated by lacunosus, rafts of waves and fall streak holes. Best of all, as the altocumulus passed near the Sun, they lit up in a riot of colors, calledcloud corona (e). These are not related to the solar corona.

Cloud coronae colors are due to diffraction of sunlight by microscopic water droplets. When the droplets are all about the same size, which is a rarity in clouds because there’s usually a large range of particle sizes, their colors can be relatively pure and bright. Most colors occur in circular rings around the Sun. But when different parts of the cloud have groups of droplets, each with its own size range, the color distribution in the sky can be somewhat chaotic, with reds and greens intermingled. This effect is called commonly called irisation and can be seen many degrees from the Sun. 
 
Cloud coronae are the brightest and most colorful of sky phenomena, easily outshining the rainbow andcircumzenithal and circumhorizontal arcs. They’re also very common, yet few people see them. Why? Because cononae are so close to the Sun, and most people don’t look in this direction. Be sure to block the Sun with your hand or something else and also wear sunglasses — these coronae are bright.