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Lion in Gold - Photo and comment by Alison Buttigieg
A young Kalahari Lion walking towards its pride in the early morning at Mpaya Pan in Mabuasehube, Botswana. He and his brother got separated from the rest of their pride during the night as they preferred to stay in our campsite goofing around & destroying our stuff while the others moved on.
Equipment: Canon 7D | Canon 300 2.8 IS II + Canon Extender 1.4 Mk III | Beanbag

Lion in Gold - Photo and comment by Alison Buttigieg

A young Kalahari Lion walking towards its pride in the early morning at Mpaya Pan in Mabuasehube, Botswana. He and his brother got separated from the rest of their pride during the night as they preferred to stay in our campsite goofing around & destroying our stuff while the others moved on.
Equipment: Canon 7D | Canon 300 2.8 IS II + Canon Extender 1.4 Mk III | Beanbag
Gorilla Fund
Virunga Mountains - Mountain gorillas, Dian Fossey and pygmies
The American Dian Fossey was the first to draw attention to the poachers that were hunting the mountain gorillas in the Virunga region. In 1967, she made the mountain slopes of the Visoke volcano her home, to study the animals more closely. She does so for no less than 18 years and with unending patience. She gains the trust of the animals as she copies their behavior, the way they eat plants, the way they scratch themselves and she also pounds her chest and burps just like the gorillas. After three years she stuck out her hand to a gorilla and the animal touched her fingers with his.
The lifeline of this mountain is formed by eight volcanoes. They are spread across a distance of 60 km and have beautiful names like Karisimbi (4,507 m), Visoke (3,711 m), Lake Ngezi (3,000 m), Sabyinyo (3,634 m), Gahinga (3,474 m), Muhabura (4,127 m), Nyiragongo (3,465 m) and Nyamulagira (3,053 m). Only the latter two are active and particularly the last one is among the most active volcanoes in the world. So there is always smoke visible here. The other volcanoes have been quiet for a prolonged period of time. 
http://www.amazingplaces.com/africa/rwanda/virunga_mountains/the-story-behind.html

Virunga Mountains - Mountain gorillas, Dian Fossey and pygmies

The American Dian Fossey was the first to draw attention to the poachers that were hunting the mountain gorillas in the Virunga region. In 1967, she made the mountain slopes of the Visoke volcano her home, to study the animals more closely. She does so for no less than 18 years and with unending patience. She gains the trust of the animals as she copies their behavior, the way they eat plants, the way they scratch themselves and she also pounds her chest and burps just like the gorillas. After three years she stuck out her hand to a gorilla and the animal touched her fingers with his.
  • The lifeline of this mountain is formed by eight volcanoes. They are spread across a distance of 60 km and have beautiful names like Karisimbi (4,507 m), Visoke (3,711 m), Lake Ngezi (3,000 m), Sabyinyo (3,634 m), Gahinga (3,474 m), Muhabura (4,127 m), Nyiragongo (3,465 m) and Nyamulagira (3,053 m). Only the latter two are active and particularly the last one is among the most active volcanoes in the world. So there is always smoke visible here. The other volcanoes have been quiet for a prolonged period of time. 

http://www.amazingplaces.com/africa/rwanda/virunga_mountains/the-story-behind.html

Saharan Art
Gravure rupestre datée de 8000 ans à Dabous,toujours au Niger. Considéré comme l’un des plus fins petroglyphe (dessin sur pierre) du monde. Le détail remarquable est ce trait relié au museau qui laisse à penser que la girafe était un animal apprivoisé.La découverte a été faite récemment par un targui au sommet d’une colline granitique.

Saharan Art

Gravure rupestre datée de 8000 ans à Dabous,toujours au Niger. Considéré comme l’un des plus fins petroglyphe (dessin sur pierre) du monde. Le détail remarquable est ce trait relié au museau qui laisse à penser que la girafe était un animal apprivoisé.
La découverte a été faite récemment par un targui au sommet d’une colline granitique.

Perfectly preserved ceiling paintings in Tigray’s Af Arabtu Ensessa Church

(Tim Bewer/Getty)

Perfectly preserved ceiling paintings in Tigray’s Af Arabtu Ensessa Church

(Tim Bewer/Getty)

Lalibela is a town in northern Ethiopia that is famous for its monolithic rock-cut churches. Lalibela is one of Ethiopia’s holiest cities, second only to Aksum, and is a center of pilgrimage for much of the country. Unlike Aksum, the population of Lalibela is almost completely Ethiopian Orthodox Christian

History:  During the reign of Saint Gebre Mesqel Lalibela (a member of the Zagwe Dynasty, who ruled Ethiopia in the late 12th century and early 13th century) the current town of Lalibela was known as Roha. The saintly king was given this name due to a swarm of bees said to have surrounded him at his birth, which his mother took as a sign of his future reign as Emperor of Ethiopia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lalibela

One of these is not like the others …

One of these is not like the others …

Zebras on the move

Zebras on the move

Zebras under a Rainbow - I think they might actually be Unicorns in disguise.

Zebras under a Rainbow - I think they might actually be Unicorns in disguise.

Young Dinka herder minding the cattle

Young Dinka herder minding the cattle

Crater Lakes in the Albertine Rift – Africa -   Photograph by Joel Sartore 

Crater Lakes in the Albertine Rift – Africa -   Photograph by Joel Sartore 

 Zebra duiker
The zebra duiker is a small antelope found in Ivory Coast, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. It has also been recently discovered in south east Guinea.

 Zebra duiker

The zebra duiker is a small antelope found in Ivory Coast, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. It has also been recently discovered in south east Guinea.

Samburu, Kenya from Vanishing Tribes - These warriors -  kill lions with their bare hands - defending their herds

Jimmy Nelson

PHOTOGRAPHER OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLE

Ghadames, Libya
From National Geographic: Tight clusters of traditional mud-brick-and-palm houses have stood for centuries in Ghadames, a pre-Roman oasis town in the Sahara. Rooftop walkways allowed women to move freely, concealed from men’s view.

Ghadames, Libya

From National Geographic: Tight clusters of traditional mud-brick-and-palm houses have stood for centuries in Ghadames, a pre-Roman oasis town in the Sahara. Rooftop walkways allowed women to move freely, concealed from men’s view.

Elephant Paradise - Photo and Comment by Paul Slyer:
Due to the huge trees of Mana Pools, it is one of the only places in Africa where you can witness elephants reaching up in this way to collect food Ana trees and apple leaves. On occasion you will witness them standing only on there back legs to grab seed pods that is just out of reach when standing on all four legs.



Equipment: Nikon D3 and a Nikkor 70-200mm at 200mm, f5 and ISO 320

Elephant Paradise - Photo and Comment by Paul Slyer:

Due to the huge trees of Mana Pools, it is one of the only places in Africa where you can witness elephants reaching up in this way to collect food Ana trees and apple leaves. On occasion you will witness them standing only on there back legs to grab seed pods that is just out of reach when standing on all four legs.
Equipment: Nikon D3 and a Nikkor 70-200mm at 200mm, f5 and ISO 320
Namib Desert - Credit: KARI/ESA
This striking view of the Namib Sand Sea in southern Africa was captured by South Korea’s Kompsat-2 satellite on Jan. 7, 2012. The Namib is the world’s oldest desert, and stretches roughly 13,125 square miles (34,000 square kilometers) along Africa’s southwestern coast — from Angola, through Namibia to South Africa.In the satellite photo, the blue and white area is the Tsauchab, a dry stream bed that only carries water during rare rainfall in the Naukluft Mountains to the east. Black dots of vegetation are concentrated near the river’s main route, and the bright white patches are salt deposits.The Namib Sand Sea in Namibia was recently inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Namib Desert - Credit: KARI/ESA

This striking view of the Namib Sand Sea in southern Africa was captured by South Korea’s Kompsat-2 satellite on Jan. 7, 2012. The Namib is the world’s oldest desert, and stretches roughly 13,125 square miles (34,000 square kilometers) along Africa’s southwestern coast — from Angola, through Namibia to South Africa.

In the satellite photo, the blue and white area is the Tsauchab, a dry stream bed that only carries water during rare rainfall in the Naukluft Mountains to the east. Black dots of vegetation are concentrated near the river’s main route, and the bright white patches are salt deposits.

The Namib Sand Sea in Namibia was recently inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.