Botswana is home to one of the world’s largest zebra populations.
Brooklyn-based photographer Zack Secker provides mind-blowing view of the savannah
He used an ultra-light aircraft to photograph what only birds can see.
Source:  CNN
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Botswana is home to one of the world’s largest zebra populations.
Brooklyn-based photographer Zack Secker provides mind-blowing view of the savannah
He used an ultra-light aircraft to photograph what only birds can see.
Source:  CNN
Zoom Info

Botswana is home to one of the world’s largest zebra populations.

  • Brooklyn-based photographer Zack Secker provides mind-blowing view of the savannah
  • He used an ultra-light aircraft to photograph what only birds can see.
  • Source:  CNN
The Bull - Photo by Fabio De Gennaro


Photographer’s Comment:
I tried to photo (sic) this wonderful big male with these amazing tusks from a low level to enhance the sense of greatness of the animal. While I was shooting my thinking run sadly to poachers. Ngorongoro, Tanzania

The Bull - Photo by Fabio De Gennaro

Photographer’s Comment:

I tried to photo (sic) this wonderful big male with these amazing tusks from a low level to enhance the sense of greatness of the animal. While I was shooting my thinking run sadly to poachers. Ngorongoro, Tanzania

Chimps on Candid Camera
African Wildlife Foundation

African Wildlife Foundation (AWF) has been spotting some interesting African animals through using camera traps.
Scientists around the world favor infrared cameras for wildlife monitoring because cameras typically go unnoticed by wildlife, catching animals exhibiting their natural behaviors. They are also effective for taking pictures of rare or shy animals, can be used for identifying new species, and help scientists estimate how many animals there are in a certain area. Cameras can be set off by motion detectors, or programmed to go off at regular intervals–24/7. AWF use camera traps in several of their wildlife monitoring programs.

Chimps on Candid Camera

African Wildlife Foundation

African Wildlife Foundation (AWF) has been spotting some interesting African animals through using camera traps.

Scientists around the world favor infrared cameras for wildlife monitoring because cameras typically go unnoticed by wildlife, catching animals exhibiting their natural behaviors. They are also effective for taking pictures of rare or shy animals, can be used for identifying new species, and help scientists estimate how many animals there are in a certain area. Cameras can be set off by motion detectors, or programmed to go off at regular intervals–24/7. AWF use camera traps in several of their wildlife monitoring programs.

What Happened to the Mysterious Humans of the Sahara 7,000 Years Ago?
Stefan Kröpelin is an archaeologist from Germany who wanted to find out. He and his team ventured out into the unexplored desert every year for decades, looking for clues. They tracked the locations of these cave paintings, and along the way they began to discover signs of what the Sahara had been like thousands of years ago. In massive, dry valleys they found shells and fish skeletons. They found remnants of trees and traces of pollen.
They realized that what they were witnessing was a history of climate change in the region. A once-fertile land of rains and lakes had dried up into a Martian landscape in just over 10,000 years. And as the rains moved, so too did the people.
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What Happened to the Mysterious Humans of the Sahara 7,000 Years Ago?
Stefan Kröpelin is an archaeologist from Germany who wanted to find out. He and his team ventured out into the unexplored desert every year for decades, looking for clues. They tracked the locations of these cave paintings, and along the way they began to discover signs of what the Sahara had been like thousands of years ago. In massive, dry valleys they found shells and fish skeletons. They found remnants of trees and traces of pollen.
They realized that what they were witnessing was a history of climate change in the region. A once-fertile land of rains and lakes had dried up into a Martian landscape in just over 10,000 years. And as the rains moved, so too did the people.
Zoom Info

What Happened to the Mysterious Humans of the Sahara 7,000 Years Ago?

Stefan Kröpelin is an archaeologist from Germany who wanted to find out. He and his team ventured out into the unexplored desert every year for decades, looking for clues. They tracked the locations of these cave paintings, and along the way they began to discover signs of what the Sahara had been like thousands of years ago. In massive, dry valleys they found shells and fish skeletons. They found remnants of trees and traces of pollen.

They realized that what they were witnessing was a history of climate change in the region. A once-fertile land of rains and lakes had dried up into a Martian landscape in just over 10,000 years. And as the rains moved, so too did the people.

Leopard Stares Down a Crimson-Breasted Shrike
Photography by James Kobacker, Gahanna, OH, USA
Photographed at Namibia
 

Leopard Stares Down a Crimson-Breasted Shrike

Photography by James Kobacker, Gahanna, OH, USA

Photographed at Namibia

 

Kundi harp; old recording from Congo, Afrika (1952)

Kundi player Bakia Pierre was recorded by Hugh Tracey in 1952, when the latter visited Buta in the country then called Belgian Congo. The first of the photos shows a kundi player; not Bakia Pierre himself but another man from the same Congo region in the 50´s.
The second picture shows the actual instrument, kundi.
The third is a photo of the road to Buta.

Lion in Gold - Photo and comment by Alison Buttigieg
A young Kalahari Lion walking towards its pride in the early morning at Mpaya Pan in Mabuasehube, Botswana. He and his brother got separated from the rest of their pride during the night as they preferred to stay in our campsite goofing around & destroying our stuff while the others moved on.
Equipment: Canon 7D | Canon 300 2.8 IS II + Canon Extender 1.4 Mk III | Beanbag

Lion in Gold - Photo and comment by Alison Buttigieg

A young Kalahari Lion walking towards its pride in the early morning at Mpaya Pan in Mabuasehube, Botswana. He and his brother got separated from the rest of their pride during the night as they preferred to stay in our campsite goofing around & destroying our stuff while the others moved on.
Equipment: Canon 7D | Canon 300 2.8 IS II + Canon Extender 1.4 Mk III | Beanbag
Gorilla Fund
Virunga Mountains - Mountain gorillas, Dian Fossey and pygmies
The American Dian Fossey was the first to draw attention to the poachers that were hunting the mountain gorillas in the Virunga region. In 1967, she made the mountain slopes of the Visoke volcano her home, to study the animals more closely. She does so for no less than 18 years and with unending patience. She gains the trust of the animals as she copies their behavior, the way they eat plants, the way they scratch themselves and she also pounds her chest and burps just like the gorillas. After three years she stuck out her hand to a gorilla and the animal touched her fingers with his.
The lifeline of this mountain is formed by eight volcanoes. They are spread across a distance of 60 km and have beautiful names like Karisimbi (4,507 m), Visoke (3,711 m), Lake Ngezi (3,000 m), Sabyinyo (3,634 m), Gahinga (3,474 m), Muhabura (4,127 m), Nyiragongo (3,465 m) and Nyamulagira (3,053 m). Only the latter two are active and particularly the last one is among the most active volcanoes in the world. So there is always smoke visible here. The other volcanoes have been quiet for a prolonged period of time. 
http://www.amazingplaces.com/africa/rwanda/virunga_mountains/the-story-behind.html

Virunga Mountains - Mountain gorillas, Dian Fossey and pygmies

The American Dian Fossey was the first to draw attention to the poachers that were hunting the mountain gorillas in the Virunga region. In 1967, she made the mountain slopes of the Visoke volcano her home, to study the animals more closely. She does so for no less than 18 years and with unending patience. She gains the trust of the animals as she copies their behavior, the way they eat plants, the way they scratch themselves and she also pounds her chest and burps just like the gorillas. After three years she stuck out her hand to a gorilla and the animal touched her fingers with his.
  • The lifeline of this mountain is formed by eight volcanoes. They are spread across a distance of 60 km and have beautiful names like Karisimbi (4,507 m), Visoke (3,711 m), Lake Ngezi (3,000 m), Sabyinyo (3,634 m), Gahinga (3,474 m), Muhabura (4,127 m), Nyiragongo (3,465 m) and Nyamulagira (3,053 m). Only the latter two are active and particularly the last one is among the most active volcanoes in the world. So there is always smoke visible here. The other volcanoes have been quiet for a prolonged period of time. 

http://www.amazingplaces.com/africa/rwanda/virunga_mountains/the-story-behind.html

Saharan Art
Gravure rupestre datée de 8000 ans à Dabous,toujours au Niger. Considéré comme l’un des plus fins petroglyphe (dessin sur pierre) du monde. Le détail remarquable est ce trait relié au museau qui laisse à penser que la girafe était un animal apprivoisé.La découverte a été faite récemment par un targui au sommet d’une colline granitique.

Saharan Art

Gravure rupestre datée de 8000 ans à Dabous,toujours au Niger. Considéré comme l’un des plus fins petroglyphe (dessin sur pierre) du monde. Le détail remarquable est ce trait relié au museau qui laisse à penser que la girafe était un animal apprivoisé.
La découverte a été faite récemment par un targui au sommet d’une colline granitique.