ARIZONA - Fernholes Natural Bridge gets its name from several fern-lined potholes in the vicinity (one of which can be seen in this photo). It is composed of Navajo Sandstone and is located on Navajo land in a remote and very seldom visited area of Arizona, in a short side branch of Navajo Creek, and special permit is required for visitation. 

ARIZONA - Fernholes Natural Bridge gets its name from several fern-lined potholes in the vicinity (one of which can be seen in this photo). It is composed of Navajo Sandstone and is located on Navajo land in a remote and very seldom visited area of Arizona, in a short side branch of Navajo Creek, and special permit is required for visitation. 

WOODSTOCK PHOTO COUPLE STILL TOGETHER AFTER 45 YEARS
That same moment remains as vivid to Bobbi and Nick as it does to anybody.

Two years after Woodstock, they’ve married and they now have children ages 33 and 35. They’ve always been community-minded and would have been so whether or not they had gone to Woodstock, said Bobbi. She is a school nurse. She also started a food pantry out of her office, while Nick inspects houses of poor people that were about to be renovated by the government.
“I think the further we get from the original event the more meaningful it becomes, the more we realize how phenomenal it was: all those people coming together with no violence, just peace, love and sharing,” Bobbi says. “Forty years later it’s just remarkable that it could have occurred.”

 Source:  Danglingmouse
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WOODSTOCK PHOTO COUPLE STILL TOGETHER AFTER 45 YEARS
That same moment remains as vivid to Bobbi and Nick as it does to anybody.

Two years after Woodstock, they’ve married and they now have children ages 33 and 35. They’ve always been community-minded and would have been so whether or not they had gone to Woodstock, said Bobbi. She is a school nurse. She also started a food pantry out of her office, while Nick inspects houses of poor people that were about to be renovated by the government.
“I think the further we get from the original event the more meaningful it becomes, the more we realize how phenomenal it was: all those people coming together with no violence, just peace, love and sharing,” Bobbi says. “Forty years later it’s just remarkable that it could have occurred.”

 Source:  Danglingmouse
Zoom Info

WOODSTOCK PHOTO COUPLE STILL TOGETHER AFTER 45 YEARS

That same moment remains as vivid to Bobbi and Nick as it does to anybody.

Two years after Woodstock, they’ve married and they now have children ages 33 and 35. They’ve always been community-minded and would have been so whether or not they had gone to Woodstock, said Bobbi. She is a school nurse. She also started a food pantry out of her office, while Nick inspects houses of poor people that were about to be renovated by the government.

“I think the further we get from the original event the more meaningful it becomes, the more we realize how phenomenal it was: all those people coming together with no violence, just peace, love and sharing,” Bobbi says. “Forty years later it’s just remarkable that it could have occurred.”

 Source:  Danglingmouse

Painted Canoe prow in crocodile form Sepik River, Papua New Guinea Eroded wood One-of-a-Kind wood Carved crocodile head. PAPUA NEW GUINEA, canoe prow in form of crocodile head. 20th century. Carved wood with black pigments. 
This massive canoe prow, in the form of a crocodile head, Once part of the front end of a dugout ‘crocanoe,’ this type of naturalistic carving was believed to help guard against crocodile attacks due to its resemblance to the creature itself. The story goes in this part of Papua New Guinea: crocodiles do not kill other crocodiles. 

Painted Canoe prow in crocodile form Sepik River, Papua New Guinea Eroded wood One-of-a-Kind wood Carved crocodile head. PAPUA NEW GUINEA, canoe prow in form of crocodile head. 20th century. Carved wood with black pigments.

This massive canoe prow, in the form of a crocodile head, Once part of the front end of a dugout ‘crocanoe,’ this type of naturalistic carving was believed to help guard against crocodile attacks due to its resemblance to the creature itself. The story goes in this part of Papua New Guinea: crocodiles do not kill other crocodiles. 

This beautiful specimen is a Manul, otherwise known as Pallas’s Cat.  About twelve million years ago it was one of the first two modern cats to evolve and it hasn’t changed since. The other species, Martelli’s Cat, is extinct so what you are looking at here is a unique window in to the past of modern cats.
Take a close look at the eyes of the Manul.  Do you see a difference between it and the domestic cat? That’s right, the pupils of the Manul are round, not slit-like.  Proportionally too, the legs are smaller than cats we know and they can’t run anywhere near as quickly.  As for the ears, well, when you actually can catch sight of them they are very low and much further apart than you would see in a domestic cat.
The main reason for its survival throughout the ages has been its isolation. In the wild it lives on the Asian steppes at substantial heights – up to 13,000 feet.  Based in India, Pakistan, western China and Mongolia as well as Afghanistan and Turkemistan, it has even been discovered recently in the wilds of the Sayan region of Siberia. In these places it prefers rocky areas, semidesert and barren hillsides. 
Source: arkinspace
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This beautiful specimen is a Manul, otherwise known as Pallas’s Cat.  About twelve million years ago it was one of the first two modern cats to evolve and it hasn’t changed since. The other species, Martelli’s Cat, is extinct so what you are looking at here is a unique window in to the past of modern cats.
Take a close look at the eyes of the Manul.  Do you see a difference between it and the domestic cat? That’s right, the pupils of the Manul are round, not slit-like.  Proportionally too, the legs are smaller than cats we know and they can’t run anywhere near as quickly.  As for the ears, well, when you actually can catch sight of them they are very low and much further apart than you would see in a domestic cat.
The main reason for its survival throughout the ages has been its isolation. In the wild it lives on the Asian steppes at substantial heights – up to 13,000 feet.  Based in India, Pakistan, western China and Mongolia as well as Afghanistan and Turkemistan, it has even been discovered recently in the wilds of the Sayan region of Siberia. In these places it prefers rocky areas, semidesert and barren hillsides. 
Source: arkinspace
Zoom Info
This beautiful specimen is a Manul, otherwise known as Pallas’s Cat.  About twelve million years ago it was one of the first two modern cats to evolve and it hasn’t changed since. The other species, Martelli’s Cat, is extinct so what you are looking at here is a unique window in to the past of modern cats.
Take a close look at the eyes of the Manul.  Do you see a difference between it and the domestic cat? That’s right, the pupils of the Manul are round, not slit-like.  Proportionally too, the legs are smaller than cats we know and they can’t run anywhere near as quickly.  As for the ears, well, when you actually can catch sight of them they are very low and much further apart than you would see in a domestic cat.
The main reason for its survival throughout the ages has been its isolation. In the wild it lives on the Asian steppes at substantial heights – up to 13,000 feet.  Based in India, Pakistan, western China and Mongolia as well as Afghanistan and Turkemistan, it has even been discovered recently in the wilds of the Sayan region of Siberia. In these places it prefers rocky areas, semidesert and barren hillsides. 
Source: arkinspace
Zoom Info

This beautiful specimen is a Manul, otherwise known as Pallas’s Cat.  About twelve million years ago it was one of the first two modern cats to evolve and it hasn’t changed since. The other species, Martelli’s Cat, is extinct so what you are looking at here is a unique window in to the past of modern cats.

  • Take a close look at the eyes of the Manul.  Do you see a difference between it and the domestic cat? That’s right, the pupils of the Manul are round, not slit-like.  Proportionally too, the legs are smaller than cats we know and they can’t run anywhere near as quickly.  As for the ears, well, when you actually can catch sight of them they are very low and much further apart than you would see in a domestic cat.
  • The main reason for its survival throughout the ages has been its isolation. In the wild it lives on the Asian steppes at substantial heights – up to 13,000 feet.  Based in India, Pakistan, western China and Mongolia as well as Afghanistan and Turkemistan, it has even been discovered recently in the wilds of the Sayan region of Siberia. In these places it prefers rocky areas, semidesert and barren hillsides. 

Source: arkinspace