Tufted Deer
The Tufted deer (Elaphodus cephalopus) is a small species of deer found in high altitude forests of Burma and China. They have a prominent tuft of hair on their heads which gives them their name, but they also look like an adorable vampire. Their fangs are long upper canines, which are similar to what you’d find in their close relative the muntjac. They’re very territorial animals, and although they have small antlers the males use these sharp canines to fight over both territory and mates.
Photo - Wikipedia

Tufted Deer

The Tufted deer (Elaphodus cephalopus) is a small species of deer found in high altitude forests of Burma and China. They have a prominent tuft of hair on their heads which gives them their name, but they also look like an adorable vampire. Their fangs are long upper canines, which are similar to what you’d find in their close relative the muntjac. They’re very territorial animals, and although they have small antlers the males use these sharp canines to fight over both territory and mates.

Photo - Wikipedia

California Blue Whales Bounce Back From Whaling
September 5, 2014 | by Justine Alford

Measuring some 30 meters (100 feet) in length and weighing in at a whopping 200 tons (181 metric), blue whales are the largest animals on Earth. In fact, they’re the heaviest animals to have ever lived on our planet, weighing more than the largest known dinosaur. Unfortunately, these iconic whales are an endangered species. They were aggressively hunted to the brink of extinction in the 1900s by whalers seeking their meat and oil. Between 1900 and the 1960s, it is estimated that around 360,000 blue whales were poached, mostly by Russian fleets.  
Blue whales became protected in 1966, but since then their populations have only slightly recovered. Now, however, new research by scientists at the University of Washington suggests that California blue whales have bounced back. Remarkably, their population has now virtually returned to historical levels, making them the only population known to have rebounded from whaling.
“The recovery of California blue whales from whaling demonstrates the ability of blue whale populations to rebuild under careful management and conservation measures,” said Cole Monnahan, lead author of the Marine Mammal Science study, in a news release.

California Blue Whales Bounce Back From Whaling

September 5, 2014 | by Justine Alford

Measuring some 30 meters (100 feet) in length and weighing in at a whopping 200 tons (181 metric), blue whales are the largest animals on Earth. In fact, they’re the heaviest animals to have ever lived on our planet, weighing more than the largest known dinosaur. Unfortunately, these iconic whales are an endangered species. They were aggressively hunted to the brink of extinction in the 1900s by whalers seeking their meat and oil. Between 1900 and the 1960s, it is estimated that around 360,000 blue whales were poached, mostly by Russian fleets.  

Blue whales became protected in 1966, but since then their populations have only slightly recovered. Now, however, new research by scientists at the University of Washington suggests that California blue whales have bounced back. Remarkably, their population has now virtually returned to historical levels, making them the only population known to have rebounded from whaling.

“The recovery of California blue whales from whaling demonstrates the ability of blue whale populations to rebuild under careful management and conservation measures,” said Cole Monnahan, lead author of the Marine Mammal Science study, in a news release.

Deer graze in the foreground of this stunning image of the full Harvest Moon captured in 2013.
Photo:  ANTHONY LYNCH


The full Harvest Moon will light up the night sky on Monday (Sept. 8), and this year it comes with an extra bounty. September’s full moon will cap a trio of back-to-back “supermoons” for the Northern Hemisphere summer, according to NASA.
The moon will reach its full phase when it reaches the spot in the sky opposite from the sun. That moment will occur Monday at 9:38 p.m. EDT (0138 GMT). Monday’s full moon is the one nearest to the September equinox this year, giving it the moniker of Harvest Moon by the usual definition.
Although we associate the Harvest Moon with autumn, this year’s version is actually the last full moon of the summer season. The 2014 Harvest Moon comes about as early in the calendar as possible. However, Harvest Moons can occur as late as Oct. 7. [Amazing Photos of the 2013 Harvest Moon]

Deer graze in the foreground of this stunning image of the full Harvest Moon captured in 2013.

Photo:  ANTHONY LYNCH

The full Harvest Moon will light up the night sky on Monday (Sept. 8), and this year it comes with an extra bounty. September’s full moon will cap a trio of back-to-back “supermoons” for the Northern Hemisphere summer, according to NASA.

The moon will reach its full phase when it reaches the spot in the sky opposite from the sun. That moment will occur Monday at 9:38 p.m. EDT (0138 GMT). Monday’s full moon is the one nearest to the September equinox this year, giving it the moniker of Harvest Moon by the usual definition.

Although we associate the Harvest Moon with autumn, this year’s version is actually the last full moon of the summer season. The 2014 Harvest Moon comes about as early in the calendar as possible. However, Harvest Moons can occur as late as Oct. 7. [Amazing Photos of the 2013 Harvest Moon]

Wettest Day on Record in Phoenix, Flooding Leaves 2 Dead - NBC News.com

Sky Harbor Airport in Phoenix reported 2.96 inches of rain before 8:30 a.m. local time, beating the old record of 2.91 inches on Sept. 4, 1939. Parts of Interstate 10 and Interstate 17 were closed with the morning rush hour just beginning. A state Department of Public Safety Officer used the roof of his SUV to transport three motorists who had been stranded on an inundated part of I-10, a spokesman said.