The mini musk turtle weighs only 0.03 ounces and is the smallest turtle ever hatched at Pacific Northwest Turtleworks in Kenmore, Wash.

The mini musk turtle weighs only 0.03 ounces and is the smallest turtle ever hatched at Pacific Northwest Turtleworks in Kenmore, Wash.

crashinglybeautiful:

"I believe we are endowed with a faculty of discernment that guides us to seek life-giving truths. When we encounter different faiths, we know exactly how to excavate and sift to find the jewels that lie at the heart of each tradition. Every religion contains a treasure trove of wisdom teachings and transformational practices, and each one is also burdened with divisive messages and a history of violence and oppression. The gems are our birthright, and this God-wrestling process is our legacy.
Contrary to the assumption that the inter-spiritual path is for those who lack conviction—spiritual dilettantes who dabble in the feel-good aspects of religion because they’re too lazy to cultivate the discipline required for “real” religious life—it requires tremendous rigor and courage to say “yes” to the beauty wherever we encounter it, and to say “no” to whatever generates the poison of “otheriz-ing.”
There is a subtle elitism—almost a violence—in the message that we have to “pick one path and go deep,” implying that following multiple points of entry to Spirit precludes depth. My own encounters in an array of religious contexts have been anything but shallow! And I am finding more and more people like me, who seem to be temperamentally incapable of choosing one way to God, to the exclusion of all others.
My guiding value is love. Wherever I find access to the teachings and practices of love—whenever I am drawn into a field of love in the context of religion—I enter, I drink, I allow myself to be changed by the encounter. These soul visits to the holy houses of a faith tradition not my own frequently have the effect of dissolving my preconceptions; I am delighted when that happens. I cherish not-knowing!”
–Mirabai Starr , author and adjunct professor of philosophy and world religions at the University of New Mexico-Taos, on practicing more than one tradition.
From "Interfaith Crucible: A Conversation with Mirabai Starr" in our new Fall Issue on spiritual practice.
via: parabola-magazine.

crashinglybeautiful:

"I believe we are endowed with a faculty of discernment that guides us to seek life-giving truths. When we encounter different faiths, we know exactly how to excavate and sift to find the jewels that lie at the heart of each tradition. Every religion contains a treasure trove of wisdom teachings and transformational practices, and each one is also burdened with divisive messages and a history of violence and oppression. The gems are our birthright, and this God-wrestling process is our legacy.

Contrary to the assumption that the inter-spiritual path is for those who lack conviction—spiritual dilettantes who dabble in the feel-good aspects of religion because they’re too lazy to cultivate the discipline required for “real” religious life—it requires tremendous rigor and courage to say “yes” to the beauty wherever we encounter it, and to say “no” to whatever generates the poison of “otheriz-ing.”

There is a subtle elitism—almost a violence—in the message that we have to “pick one path and go deep,” implying that following multiple points of entry to Spirit precludes depth. My own encounters in an array of religious contexts have been anything but shallow! And I am finding more and more people like me, who seem to be temperamentally incapable of choosing one way to God, to the exclusion of all others.

My guiding value is love. Wherever I find access to the teachings and practices of love—whenever I am drawn into a field of love in the context of religion—I enter, I drink, I allow myself to be changed by the encounter. These soul visits to the holy houses of a faith tradition not my own frequently have the effect of dissolving my preconceptions; I am delighted when that happens. I cherish not-knowing!”

–Mirabai Starr , author and adjunct professor of philosophy and world religions at the University of New Mexico-Taos, on practicing more than one tradition.

From "Interfaith Crucible: A Conversation with Mirabai Starr" in our new Fall Issue on spiritual practice.

via: parabola-magazine.